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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Druckformat: 1072-8325
ISSN Online: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2015012197
pages 239-254

EVALUATING CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTCOMES OF UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS SELECTING BIOMEDICAL LABORATORY RESEARCH INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS

Sunita R. Chaudhary
Department of Surgical Oncology, Room 8005,120 Albany, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
Elliot J. Coups
Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
Shawna V. Hudson
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 1 World's Fair Drive, Suite 1500, Somerset, New Jersey 08873, USA
Saundra M. Tomlinson-Clarke
Graduate School of Education, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 10 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA

ABSTRAKT

Racial and ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce. This pilot study used Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent et al., 1994, 2000) to explore the influence of laboratory vs. nonlaboratory biomedical internship programs on minority students' self-efficacy and career intent. Both internship programs were designed to promote biomedical career choice. Pre/post surveys were administered to participants in both programs. Presurveys were completed by 231 students within one week of the start of an internship program. Of these, 117 students completed the postsurveys after completing their respective program. A gender effect was found for parental education level and participation in laboratory research internship programs. Women whose parents had college or graduate degrees were significantly more likely to participate in laboratory research internship programs. Students whose parents had no college education reported a higher pre-post change for interest in science than did students who had both parents with graduate degrees. Gender modulated correlation between birth in the United States and participation in laboratory research internship programs. Compared to foreign-born women, native-born women were more likely to participate in laboratory research internship programs. Gender moderated pre-post change in students' beliefs about their ability to understand scientific research in laboratory research internship programs. Women who participated in laboratory research internship programs had higher pre-post change in ability to understand scientific research than did women who participated in nonlaboratory research programs. Results suggested that parental education level is a predictor of student choice of internship programs. Our findings also suggest that laboratory research programs may provide greater benefit to minority native-born women students as reflected by higher scores on measures of science self-efficacy following their participation


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