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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.145 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Druckformat: 1050-6934
ISSN Online: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.v13.i4.70
14 pages

Long-Term Results of a Cementless Knee Prosthesis with a Metal-Backed Patellar Component: Clinical and Radiological Follow-Up with Histology from Retrieved Components

Mikael Sundfeldt
Department of Biomaterials/Handicap Research, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Göteborg; Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Göteborg, Sweden
Carina B. Johansson
Department of Biomaterials/Handicap Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg; and Department of Technology, University of Orebro, Orebro, Sweden
Lars Regner
Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
Tomas Albrektsson
Department of Biomaterials/Handicap Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
Lars V Carlsson
Department of Biomaterials/Handicap Research, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

ABSTRAKT

Aseptic loosening of cemented knee arthroplasties has encouraged development of uncemented fixation. The Miller–Galante I (MG I) prosthesis was designed to achieve permanent stability through ingrowth into a titanium fiber mesh. Thirty-five knees in 30 patients with MG I knee replacements have been followed clinically and radiologically with a mean follow-up of 12 years. Twenty knees were revised with a mean follow-up of 5 years. Patellofemoral problems, especially avulsion of the polyethylene from the metal-backed patella and in some cases severe metallosis, have been the main reason for revision. Metal-backed patellar component should be avoided. In addition, instability has been a problem. However, the fixation of the components has been excellent, with a high degree of osseous ingrowth displayed at histological analysis of retrieved components. The clinical and radiological results after revision are in most cases good, despite the femoral component having been left in situ.


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