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Critical Reviews™ in Immunology
Impact-faktor: 1.352 5-jähriger Impact-Faktor: 3.347 SJR: 0.657 SNIP: 0.55 CiteScore™: 2.19

ISSN Druckformat: 1040-8401
ISSN Online: 2162-6472

Volumes:
Volumen 39, 2019 Volumen 38, 2018 Volumen 37, 2017 Volumen 36, 2016 Volumen 35, 2015 Volumen 34, 2014 Volumen 33, 2013 Volumen 32, 2012 Volumen 31, 2011 Volumen 30, 2010 Volumen 29, 2009 Volumen 28, 2008 Volumen 27, 2007 Volumen 26, 2006 Volumen 25, 2005 Volumen 24, 2004 Volumen 23, 2003 Volumen 22, 2002 Volumen 21, 2001 Volumen 20, 2000 Volumen 19, 1999 Volumen 18, 1998 Volumen 17, 1997 Volumen 16, 1996 Volumen 15, 1995 Volumen 14, 1994

Critical Reviews™ in Immunology

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevImmunol.v29.i6.10
pages 443-468

Regulation of Allergy with RNA Interference

Motohiko Suzuki
Departments of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Japan
Xiufen Zheng
Departments of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
Xusheng Zhang
Departments of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
Yuwei Zhang
Medistem Laboratories, San Diego, CA
Thomas E. Ichim
Departments of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; Medistem Laboratories, San Diego, CA
Weiping Min
Departments of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario

ABSTRAKT

Allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis are clinically challenging. Although current treatments such as antihistamines, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and corticosteroids are effective at reducing symptoms, they do not address the underlying cause of the allergic response. Therefore, novel therapies that target upstream causative events in allergic diseases are desirable. The induction of RNA interference (RNAi) by small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a potent method for specifically knocking down molecular targets. Gene modulation by siRNA is therapeutically promising, with clinical safety and feasibility already demonstrated. However, to our knowledge, the use of siRNA in the area of allergic disease has been limited. Recently, we demonstrated the inhibition of CD40 by siRNA as a means of inhibiting allergic reactions. RNAi-based therapies represent a novel and promising strategy for the control of both the symptoms of allergy and the cause of the allergic response. Here we discuss the potential of siRNA in the treatment of allergic diseases by focusing on molecular and cellular interactions involved in the allergic cascade.