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Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering
SJR: 0.243 SNIP: 0.376 CiteScore™: 0.79

ISSN Druckformat: 0278-940X
ISSN Online: 1943-619X

Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevBiomedEng.v37.i4-5.30
pages 355-375

Retinal Pigment Epithelium Differentiation of Stem Cells: Current Status and Challenges

Basak E. Uygun
Center For Engineering in Medicine, Shriners Hospital for Children, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Nripen Sharma
Center For Engineering in Medicine, Shriners Hospital for Children, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, USA
Martin Yarmush
Center For Engineering in Medicine, Shriners Hospital for Children, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA

ABSTRAKT

Degeneration and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the cause of a number of degenerative retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy, leading to blindness that affects three million Americans as of now. Transplantation of RPE aims to restore retinal structure and the interaction between the RPE and photoreceptors, which is fundamental to sight. Although a significant amount of progress has been made in the past 20 years in autologous RPE transplantation, sources for RPE cells are limited. Recent advances in stem cell culture and differentiation techniques have allowed the generation of RPE cells from pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we discuss strategies for generating functional RPE cells from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and summarize transplantation studies of these derived RPEs. We conclude with challenges in cell-replacement therapies using human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPEs.