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Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.198 SNIP: 0.183 CiteScore™: 0.57

ISSN Druckformat: 1947-5764
ISSN Online: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2012003626
pages 215-230

Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Decontamination of Protein-Loaded Biodegradable Nanoparticles for Nervous Tissue Repair

Jason Coleman
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel Univeristy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Adam Yost
A. J. Drexel Plasma Institute, Drexel University, Camden, New Jersey
Ross Goren
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Gregory Fridman
C&J Nyheim Plasma Institute, Drexel University, Camden, New Jersey 08103
Anthony Lowman
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

ABSTRAKT

When injected directly into spinal tissue, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles have the potential to provide sustained delivery of proteins necessary to promote nerve regeneration. To ensure the injection of sterile particles, a novel decontamination method was developed that can inactivate bacteria while maintaining particle and protein integrity. This method involves the resuspension of protein-loaded particles after preparation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or deionized water that has been subjected to a nonthermal atmospheric pressure discharge. Although different treatment times were required, it was demonstrated that both plasma-treated PBS and water can completely inactivate Escherichia coli when added at a concentration of 103 colony-forming units/mL to PLGA particles with and without protein. Plasma-treated water showed no impact on particle morphology. Plasma treatment of water for 1 minute resulted in the complete sterilization of protein-loaded particles but was able to maintain only 26.6 ± 5.0% of protein activity. On the other hand, plasma-treated PBS required 2 minutes of treatment for complete sterilization of protein-loaded particles but was able to maintain 68.4 ± 10.6% of protein activity. Particles were considered sterile if no bacterial growth was observed after being plated onto bacterial growth agar. The effect of plasma-treated water on release of active protein from particles caused a substantial loss in the initial burst release of protein but did not limit the ability of the particles to provide a sustained release of active protein.


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