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Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.271 SNIP: 0.316 CiteScore™: 1.9

ISSN Druckformat: 1947-5764
ISSN Online: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2017019033
pages 375-388

Broccoli: Antimicrobial Efficacy and Influences to Sensory and Storage Properties by Microwave Plasma-Processed Air Treatment

Uta Schnabel
Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
Rijana Niquet
Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
Mathias Andrasch
Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
Marion Jakobs
Landesforschungsanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Fischerei M-V, 18276 Gülzow, Germany
Oliver Schlüter
Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
Kai-Uwe Katroschan
Landesforschungsanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Fischerei M-V, 18276 Gülzow, Germany
Klaus-Dieter Weltmann
Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), ZIK Plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany
Jörg Ehlbeck
Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, 17489 Greifswald, Germany

ABSTRAKT

Currently used disinfection and sanitation methods for fresh fruits and vegetables lack antimicrobial effectiveness and are high in cost, water consumption, or chemicals. One alternative may be nonthermal plasma at atmospheric pressure. The plasma setup used depends on microwave plasma, which generates plasma-processed air (PPA) with manifold chemical and antimicrobial compounds mainly based on reactive nitrogen species. Fresh broccoli florets were contaminated with seven different microorganisms (bacteria, yeast, and endospores) and then treated with PPA. After a maximum treatment time of 15 min, reduction rates greater than 5 log were achieved. Furthermore, sensory examination and storage experiments showed influences on texture, appearance, odor, and shelf-life. Clearly, plasma and the generated chemical mixture that leads to high microbial inactivation on specimens offer a wide range of possible uses. However, food quality must be further investigated.


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