Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.278 SNIP: 0.183 CiteScore™: 0.57

ISSN Druckformat: 1947-5764
ISSN Online: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2016018683
pages 247-254

Inactivation of Bacteria using Discharge Plasma under Liquid Fertilizer in a Hydroponic Culture System

Takamasa Okumura
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University Morioka, Iwate, Japan
Yoshinori Saito
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University Morioka, Iwate, Japan
Kohei Takano
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University Morioka, Iwate, Japan
Katsuyuki Takahashi
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University Morioka, Iwate, Japan
Koichi Takaki
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University Morioka, Iwate, Japan
Naoya Satta
Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, Iwate, Japan
Takuya Fujio
Iwate Agricultural Research Center, Iwate, Japan

ABSTRAKT

We developed a discharge plasma reactor under liquid fertilizer for inactivating bacteria in the recirculation system of hydroponics. The plasma reactor consisted of a wire electrode that was placed in an insulating circular cylinder and a grounded electrode on a cylinder outside. The reactor was sunk under liquid fertilizer when used. Atmospheric air was injected into the cylinder using a gas pump and released through arrayed tiny holes of the reactor. Repetitive nanosecond high-voltage pulses were applied to the wire electrode using a magnetic pulse compression pulsed-power generator. The performance of the developed reactor was evaluated using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., Rinka 409) seedlings in hydroponics. In this study, 15 L of liquid fertilizer was contaminated with Ralstonia solanacearum, a plant pathogenic bacterium, after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. The discharge plasma treatment was then continued for 100 min. Results showed that the number of colony forming units (CFU) of R. solanacearum in the liquid fertilizer decreased from 107 to 102 CFU/mL using the discharge plasma treatment. Seedlings with discharge plasma treatment were relatively healthy; in contrast, all seedlings in the positive control wilted and died from infection of R. solanacearum after 12 d. Disease severity was also suppressed after discharge plasma treatment.


Articles with similar content:

Treatment of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers with a Hand-Held DBD Plasma Generator
Plasma Medicine, Vol.2, 2012, issue 1-3
Nina Mertens, Georg Daschlein, Wolfgang Viol, Steffen Emmert, Franziska Brehmer, Dirk Simon, Wolfgang Maus-Friedrichs, Raees Ahmed, Michael P. Schon, Andreas Helmke, Holger Hanssle, Dirk Wandke
Optical Emission Spectroscopy as a Tool for Characterization of Technical Plasmas in Medical Applications
Plasma Medicine, Vol.2, 2012, issue 1-3
Sabrina Baldus, Katharina Stapelmann, Benjamin Denis, Nikita Bibinov , Max Engelhardt, Peter Awakowicz
Air-Based Coaxial Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Source for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Eradication
Plasma Medicine, Vol.7, 2017, issue 1
Diana Grondona, Leandro Giuliani, Juliana Soler-Arango, Magali Xaubet, Graciela Brelles-Mariño
Inactivation of Porphyromonas gingivalis by Low-Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma
Plasma Medicine, Vol.1, 2011, issue 3-4
Mounir Laroussi, Susan L. Tolle, Arwa Mahasneh, Erdinc Karakas, Michele Darby, Wayne Hynes
Rupture of an Intramedullary Elastic Bundle Nail Following Humeral Shaft Nonunion: A Case Report
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.29, 2019, issue 1
Leo Massari, Ilaria Martini, Nicola Corradi, Gaetano Caruso