Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
Atomization and Sprays
Impact-faktor: 1.262 5-jähriger Impact-Faktor: 1.518 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 1.6

ISSN Druckformat: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

Volumes:
Volumen 29, 2019 Volumen 28, 2018 Volumen 27, 2017 Volumen 26, 2016 Volumen 25, 2015 Volumen 24, 2014 Volumen 23, 2013 Volumen 22, 2012 Volumen 21, 2011 Volumen 20, 2010 Volumen 19, 2009 Volumen 18, 2008 Volumen 17, 2007 Volumen 16, 2006 Volumen 15, 2005 Volumen 14, 2004 Volumen 13, 2003 Volumen 12, 2002 Volumen 11, 2001 Volumen 10, 2000 Volumen 9, 1999 Volumen 8, 1998 Volumen 7, 1997 Volumen 6, 1996 Volumen 5, 1995 Volumen 4, 1994 Volumen 3, 1993 Volumen 2, 1992 Volumen 1, 1991

Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v15.i3.50
pages 341-362

CHARACTERIZATION OF FIRE SPRINKLER SPRAYS USING PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY

David T. Sheppard
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA
Richard M. Lueptow
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA

ABSTRAKT

Although fire sprinklers have been used for over a century for fire suppression, little is known about the character of the spray. Particle image velocimetry was used to measure the droplet velocity near the sprinkler in sprays generated from several typical fire sprinklers. The spray near the sprinkler is essentially radial, with a virtual origin for the spray velocity that is between the orifice and the deflector for pendant sprinklers and between the orifice and 0.05 m above the deflector for upright sprinklers. The maximum radial velocity in the spray ranges from 5.8 to 14.1 m/s, depending on the sprinkler and the pressure in the sprinkler pipe. The spray velocity profiles near sprinklers are dependent on the azimuthal angle and the elevation angle, though not strongly dependent. There is very little difference in the velocity profiles for pendant and upright sprinklers. However, in some cases the measured velocity can be related to sprinkler features such as notches in the deflector. Scaling the radial velocity using the water density and pressure as Ur(ρ/P)1/2 collapses the droplet velocity profiles over a wide range of pressures. The average radial velocity at a distance 20 cm from the sprinkler is approximately 0.6(P/ρ)1/2, while the maximum radial velocity in the spray 20 cm from the sprinkler is 1.0(P/ρ)1/2. The spray velocity profiles reported here are available for use in the National Institute of Standards and Technology's "Fire Dynamics Simulator," a computational model for fires and fire suppression based on large-eddy simulation techniques.


Articles with similar content:

A DESCRIPTION OF THE DROPLET SPECTRA PRODUCED BY A FLAT-FAN NOZZLE
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.3, 1993, issue 4
Andrew C. Chapple, Franklin R. Hall
Entrained Water Atomization Experiments and its Size Measurements Using Optical Measurement Techniques
International Journal of Fluid Mechanics Research, Vol.24, 1997, issue 4-6
Colin J. Bates, M. R. Ayob
ATOMIZATION : HOW MUCH INFORMATION IS ENOUGH
ICLASS 94
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Vol.0, 1994, issue
R. W. Sellens
FLUID VELOCITY AND SHEAR IN ELLIPTIC-ORIFICE SPRAY NOZZLES
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.5, 1995, issue 3
Andrew C. Chapple, R. D. Brazee, C. R. Krause, R. D. Fox, H. Zhu, D. L. Reichard
MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC CHARACTERISTICS OF GASOLINE AND BUTANOL SPRAY ATOMIZATION UNDER ELEVATED AMBIENT PRESSURES
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.28, 2018, issue 9
Yanfei Li, Hengjie Guo, Yitao Shen, Liuyang Feng, Xiao Ma, Longfei Chen