Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
Atomization and Sprays
Impact-faktor: 1.737 5-jähriger Impact-Faktor: 1.518 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 2.2

ISSN Druckformat: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

Volumes:
Volumen 30, 2020 Volumen 29, 2019 Volumen 28, 2018 Volumen 27, 2017 Volumen 26, 2016 Volumen 25, 2015 Volumen 24, 2014 Volumen 23, 2013 Volumen 22, 2012 Volumen 21, 2011 Volumen 20, 2010 Volumen 19, 2009 Volumen 18, 2008 Volumen 17, 2007 Volumen 16, 2006 Volumen 15, 2005 Volumen 14, 2004 Volumen 13, 2003 Volumen 12, 2002 Volumen 11, 2001 Volumen 10, 2000 Volumen 9, 1999 Volumen 8, 1998 Volumen 7, 1997 Volumen 6, 1996 Volumen 5, 1995 Volumen 4, 1994 Volumen 3, 1993 Volumen 2, 1992 Volumen 1, 1991

Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.2012005560
pages 351-370

PRIMARY ATOMIZATION AND DROP SIZE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ELECTROSTATIC DIELECTRIC LIQUID PULSED ATOMIZER

Agisilaos Kourmatzis
Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering
John S. Shrimpton
Energy Technology Research Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, United Kingdom, SO171BJ

ABSTRAKT

Primary atomization and drop size characteristics are presented for a fuel injector which has been modified to electrically charge dielectrics such as hydrocarbon liquids used in the transport industry. Global spray characteristics are discussed for a conventional low-pressure fuel injector with no electrostatic assistance alongside the electrostatically modified version, where the latter may also be referred to as a "fully pulsed charge injection atomizer." The atomizer is a novel device that consists of sealed high-voltage components retrofitted onto an existing fuel injector as described in Kourmatzis and Shrimpton, Journal of Electrostatics, vol. 69, pp. 157−167 (2012). Experiments conducted with continuous pulsed frequencies ranging from 1−20 Hz at average injection velocities of approximately 10 m/s up to an applied voltage of 4 kV reveal that supplying a pulsed electric charge on a pulsed flow succesfully promotes primary atomization and dispersion. In addition to continuous pulsing, single voltage pulses have been applied to the fuel injector solenoid and high-voltage electrode, at pulse widths down to 5 ms. Localized jet breakup images have revealed the time taken for a small electrically charged dielectric liquid fuel packet to atomize into droplets over a range of voltages, and, as with previous work conducted for pulsed voltage steady flow systems, frequency has no measurable effect on the atomization characteristics of pulsed flow pulsed voltage systems. Particle digital image analysis was employed in order to determine the drop sizes produced by the electrostatically modified fuel injector, and, while atomization is poor at locations close to the breakup length, droplet sizes of half the orifice diameter may be achieved with only ~2 mW of electrical power.


Articles with similar content:

ATOMIZATION, CHARGE, AND DEPOSITION CHARACTERISTICS OF BIPOLARLY CHARGED AIRCRAFT SPRAYS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.2, 1992, issue 4
Kenneth D. Kihm, B. H. Kim, A. R. McFarland
PRIMARY BREAKUP OF NONTURBULENT ROUND LIQUID JETS IN GAS CROSSFLOWS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.9, 1999, issue 3
J. Mazallon, G. M. Faeth, Z. Dai
ATOMIZATION CHARACTERISTICS OF PRESSURE-MODULATED AUTOMOTIVE PORT INJECTOR SPRAYS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.6, 1996, issue 4
Fu-Quan Zhao, Amer Ahmad Amer, John L. Dressler
TWO-PHASE FLOW MEASUREMENTS IN COXIAL JETS INCLUDING PARTICLE SIZING
ICLASS 94
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Vol.0, 1994, issue
G. Monote, Francis Roger, D. Le Visage, Jean-Louis Carreau
MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC ATOMIZER FOR LIQUID FUELS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.18, 2008, issue 2
M. J. Varady, F. L. Degertekin, J. M. Meacham, Andrei G. Fedorov, D. Esposito