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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
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ISSN Druckformat: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v18.i6.70
pages 533-537

Antibiotic Mucidin from the Porcelain Mushroom Oudemansiella mucida versus Strobilurin from Strobilurus tenacellus (Agaricomycetes)

Vaclav Sasek
Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-14220 Prague 4, Czech Republic; Vysocanska 548, 190 00 Prague 9, Czech Republic

ABSTRAKT

The antifungal antibiotic mucidin was discovered in the 1960s at the Institute of Microbiology, Prague, Czech Republic, from a submerged culture of the higher Basidiomycetes porcelain mushroom Oudemansiella mucida. Both the production and isolation of mucidin were patented in 1970. Since the patent applications were submitted in 1965 and 1967, respectively, the first disclosed information on mucidin production appeared in 1969 and the mucidin structure was reported in 1979. A series of publications appeared in 1974, covering various aspects of mucidin: mode of action, antifungal spectrum, its effectiveness compared with other antibiotics, and its ability to induce morphological changes in both filamentous fungi and yeasts. Nevertheless, in 1977, German scientists described the antibiotic strobilurin A, which is identical to mucidin, and ignored the existence of mucidin. Strobilurin and its derivatives soon became well known because of their potential as powerful fungicides. The goal of this article is to document the priority of mucidin over strobilurin.


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