Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
Impact-faktor: 1.423 5-jähriger Impact-Faktor: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.716 CiteScore™: 2.6

ISSN Druckformat: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

Volumes:
Volumen 22, 2020 Volumen 21, 2019 Volumen 20, 2018 Volumen 19, 2017 Volumen 18, 2016 Volumen 17, 2015 Volumen 16, 2014 Volumen 15, 2013 Volumen 14, 2012 Volumen 13, 2011 Volumen 12, 2010 Volumen 11, 2009 Volumen 10, 2008 Volumen 9, 2007 Volumen 8, 2006 Volumen 7, 2005 Volumen 6, 2004 Volumen 5, 2003 Volumen 4, 2002 Volumen 3, 2001 Volumen 2, 2000 Volumen 1, 1999

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v3.i4.50
5 pages

Mushrooms: The Extent of the Unexplored Potential

David L. Hawksworth
Departamiento de Biologia Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Cornplutense, Plaza de Ranion e Cajal, Ciudad Universitaria; MycoNova, The Yellow House, Madrid, Spain; Permanent address: MycoNova, 114 Finchley Lane, Hendon, London NW4 1DG, UK

ABSTRAKT

Recent estimates of the number of fungi on Earth range from 500K to 9.9 million species, of which 74−120K are named. A working figure of 1.5 million species is generally accepted, and new data suggests that is not unreasonable. Mushrooms, the definition of which is discussed, constitute at least 14K and perhaps as many as 22K known species. Most new mushrooms are being discovered in the tropics, especially those forming ectomycorrhizas with native trees. In various tropical areas, 22−55 (−73)% of mushroom species have proved to be undescribed. However, collections made over periods of a few years or less underestimate the species actually present. Further, many morphologically defined mushroom "species" prove to be assemblages of many biological species; the existence of cryptic species means that the number of known species may be an underestimate by a factor of at least five. The number of mushrooms on Earth is estimated at 140K, suggesting that only 10% are yet known. This figure was calculated by extrapolation of the proportion of mushrooms in the known fungi (18.75%) to the overall 1.5 million species estimate, with reductions to allow for the extent of novelty actually being found and a conservative allowance for numbers of cryptic species. The implications of this finding for the medicinal and nutritional exploitation of mushrooms are considered.


Articles with similar content:

Macrophytobenthos of the Zernov Phyllophora Field in present conditions (the Black Sea, Ukraine)
International Journal on Algae, Vol.11, 2009, issue 1
E. F. Kostilev, F. P. Tkachenko, I. P. Tretiak
Studies of the Antimicrobial Activity of Mushrooms (Agaricales) from South America (Review)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.20, 2018, issue 11
Roberta Paulert, Marina Giombelli Rosenberger, Vagner G. Cortez
Physiological and Genetic Variability of Commercial Isolates of Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis S. Wasser et al. (Agaricomycetideae) Cultivated in Brazil
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.7, 2005, issue 4
Carla M. Camelini, Liz C. C. Ribas, Maria A. Neves, Margarida. M. de Mendonca, Clarice L. Leite, Maria C. M. Kasuya, Elza F. Araujo
A preliminary report on the aerophytic algae of the subantarctic Auckland Islands (New Zealand)
International Journal on Algae, Vol.11, 2009, issue 4
S. L. Stephenson, Th. Smith
Medicinal Properties of Coprinoid Mushrooms (Basidiomycetes, Agaricales)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.7, 2005, issue 3
L. R. Melikyan, Susanna M. Badalyan, U. Kues, M. Navarro-Gonzalez