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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.5

ISSN Druckformat: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.2013005813
pages 35-50

The Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Upper and Lower Body Strength in Older Adults

Chantelle C. Lachance
Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Kenji A. Kenno
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Patricia L. Weir
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Kelly M. Carr
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Nancy McNevin
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Sean Horton
Adapted Physical Exercise (APEX) Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario

ABSTRAKT

Sarcopenia contributes to seniors' impairment of activities of daily living (ADLs) and overall independence. Previous research suggests both resistance (RES) and whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise can help combat sarcopenia. While literature about WBV exercise is now more prevalent, there is little known about its potential impact on seniors' upper body strength. This study aims to further evaluate the effectiveness of WBV exercise on seniors' lower body strength and explore the potential effects of WBV training on upper body strength. Fifty-five participants (33 men and 22 women; mean age, 73.3 ± 7.9 years [range, 55−90 years]) were divided into either a WBV or RES exercise group. Both exercise groups trained twice a week. Participants were assessed at baseline, after 8 sessions, and after 16 sessions. Outcome measures included the chair stand, 8-foot timed up-and-go, arm curl, triceps extension, and grip strength tests. There was a significant main effect of time found in 4 of the 5 dependent measures (chair stand test, P < 0.001; 8-foot timed up-and-go, P < 0.005; arm curl test, P < 0.001; triceps extension test, P < 0.001). The grip strength test did not show a main effect of time (P = 0.251) but did reveal a main effect for sex (P <.001). Consistent with previous WBV literature, improvements from baseline in both groups suggest WBV exercise is as effective as conventional RES training. When aiming to improve whole-body strength in seniors, WBV exercise may be a viable alternative to a traditional exercise regime.


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