Abo Bibliothek: Guest
Digitales Portal Digitale Bibliothek eBooks Zeitschriften Referenzen und Berichte Forschungssammlungen
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.5

ISSN Druckformat: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.v23.i1-4.110
pages 147-160

An Examination of Feedback Use in Rehabilitation Settings

Kelly M. Carr
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Neb Zachariah
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Patricia L. Weir
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
Nancy McNevin
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada

ABSTRAKT

Purpose: Examine therapists' use of extrinsic feedback in rehabilitation settings and determine its consistency with motor learning literature. Determine differences between perceived and actual feedback use of therapists.
Participants: Therapists (n = 6) practicing in a private clinic with a minimum of one year of clinical experience. Patients (n = 15) receiving active therapy within a private clinic.
Procedures: Two researchers observed 15 active therapy appointments. Participants were blinded to the purpose of the study. Characteristics of feedback provided by therapists were documented. Therapists completed surveys regarding perceptions of personal feedback use.
Statistical Analyses: Spearman's Rho correlations determined inter-rater reliability. Differences between therapists' perceived and actual feedback use were examined using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test. Extrinsic feedback characteristics were examined through mixed factorial ANOVAs.
Results: The use of knowledge of results (KR) and terminal feedback was over-perceived by therapists, while the use of concurrent feedback was under-perceived. Motivational feedback was provided more often than knowledge of performance (KP) and KR, while KP was provided more than KR. Concurrent feedback was used more often than terminal feedback. No differences were found between distinct and accumulated feedback use.
Conclusions: Therapists must be encouraged to use feedback principles that promote development and maintenance (i.e., learning) of motor skills.


Articles with similar content:

PARTICIPATION IN AN ALL-FEMALE ALGEBRA I CLASS: EFFECTS ON HIGH SCHOOL MATH AND SCIENCE COURSE SELECTION
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.3, 1997, issue 4
Lorrie A. Brown, Bonnie S. Wood
RETHINKING RACE IN STUDENT-FACULTY INTERACTIONS AND MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS WITH UNDERGRADUATE AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.21, 2015, issue 4
Christopher B. Newman
A MATTER OF CONFIDENCE: GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ATTITUDES TOWARD ENGAGING IN LAB AND COURSE WORK IN UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.13, 2007, issue 3
Pilar Pazos, Marina Micari, Mitra J. Z. Hartmann
Patient Clinical Outcome after Reverse Shoulder Replacement: Implementing the Oxford Shoulder Score as a Cost-Effective Tool for Outpatient Assessment
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.27, 2017, issue 1
Thiyagarajah Selvan, Georgios Stefanakis, Alexandros P. Apostolopoulos
DEMONSTRATING THE CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF UNCONSCIOUS BIAS WITH WAGES-ACADEMIC (WORKSHOP ACTIVITY FOR GENDER EQUITY SIMULATION): SHORT- AND LONG-TERM IMPACT ON FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATORS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.24, 2018, issue 2
Stephanie A Shields, Elaine C. Dicicco, Matthew J. Zawadzki, Kaitlin T. McCormick