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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.5

ISSN Druckformat: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.2014011103
pages 193-201

Plantar Pressure Analysis During Rehabilitative Exercise

Richard Marks
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Benjamin Beran
Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Engineering Center, Marquette University/Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Jason T. Long
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
Karl Canseco
Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Engineering Center (OREC), Marquette University/Medical College of Wisconsin
Salih Scott Grice
Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Engineering Center, Marquette University/Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Aniko Szabo
Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Yanzhi Wang
Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Gerald F. Harris
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Engineering Center, Marquette University/Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Director of Orthopaedic Research, Medical College of Wisconsin

ABSTRAKT

This study seeks to analyze plantar pressures as subjects perform activities on standard exercise equipment. F-Scan insoles (Tekscan, South Boston, MA) were used to measure peak pressure, pressure time integrals (PTIs), and contact area in 4 different regions of the foot: the first metatarsal head, second through fifth metatarsal heads, midfoot, and hindfoot. Nine healthy adults participated in multiple trials during stationary bicycling, stair climbing, elliptical exercise, incline and flat treadmill walking, and ground walking. The stationary bike demonstrated the lowest plantar pressures in all regions of the foot, and the stair stepper demonstrated the lowest mean peak pressure of all of the weight-bearing exercises. The stationary bicycle should be considered when reductions in plantar pressure are necessary. The stair stepper should be considered if mechanical loading is desired to maintain bone strength and density and if increased PTI can be tolerated at the forefoot and midfoot.


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