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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.17

ISSN Druckformat: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.2016018885
pages 47-55

Preoperative Low Back Pain Affects Recovery in Knee Flexion Range of Motion Following Total Knee Replacement

Hannah M. Ashworth
Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA
Christian N. Warner
Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA
Saurabh P. Mehta
School of Physical Therapy, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia
Franklin D. Shuler
Marshall University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntington, West Virginia, USA
Ali Oliashirazi
Department of Orthopedics Surgery, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA

ABSTRAKT

Background and Purpose: In this study, we examined the associations between presurgery patient profile and knee rnge of motion (ROM) outcomes at 6 and 12 months after total knee replacement (TKR). Methods: Knee ROM, demographic, health, and anthropometric variables were extracted from an existing database of patients who underwent primary TKR. Knee flexion and extension ROM at 6 and 12 months were the dependent variables. Age, sex, marital status, presurgical knee ROM, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, depression, low back pain (LBP) and number of other medical comorbidities were the independent variables. Multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between these independent variables on the outcomes of knee flexion and extension ROM at 6 and 12 months after TKR. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Poor presurgical knee flexion and presence of LBP were found to negatively affect knee flexion ROM at 6 and 12 months following TKR (P<0.05). Marital status and/or age predicted the recovery in knee extension ROM following TKR (P<0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study emphasize the need for presurgical interventions to maximize knee flexion ROM and to reduce the functional disability related to LBP to enhance the recovery of knee flexion ROM after TKR.


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