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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Print: 1072-8325
ISSN Online: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2014007902
pages 149-169

PREDICTORS OF ENGINEERING-RELATED SELF-EFFICACY AND OUTCOME EXPECTATIONS ACROSS GENDER AND RACIAL/ETHNIC GROUPS

Lisa Y. Flores
Department of Educational, School and Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA
Rachel L. Navarro
Department of Counseling Psychology and Community Services, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota, 58202, USA
Hang-Shim Lee
Department of Educational, School and Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA
Laura L. Luna
Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003, USA

ABSTRACT

To better understand the underrepresentation of women and Latino/as in engineering, the current study examined longitudinal effects between engineering-related learning experiences and self-efficacy and outcome expectations among a sample of 575 engineering students attending a Hispanic Serving Institution, a college/university where at least 25% of undergraduates are full-time Latino/a students. Specifically, using Social Cognitive Career Theory as the theoretical base, this study tests two models−one in the Realistic domain and one in the Investigative domain−to determine whether the domain-specific learning experience variables of performance accomplishments, vicarious learning, verbal persuasion, and physiological arousal significantly predict domain-specific self-efficacy and outcome expectations over time. After controlling for the effects of Time 1 variables on the respective Time 2 variables, the findings indicated that Time 1 low emotional arousal was a significant predictor of Time 2 Realistic self-efficacy, and Time 2 Realistic outcome expectations were predicted by all four Time 1 learning experiences for all groups. Further, Time 1 vicarious learning, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal had significant effects on Time 2 Investigative self-efficacy, but Time 1 performance accomplishment was not a significant predictor across racial/ethnic groups. Neither gender nor race/ethnicity moderated the cross-lagged paths in either model. Implications of the findings are discussed in regard to educational interventions for promoting the persistence of women and Latino/as in engineering programs.