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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
IF: 1.241 5-Year IF: 1.349 SJR: 0.356 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 1.61

ISSN Print: 0731-8898
ISSN Online: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvironPatholToxicolOncol.v27.i4.70
pages 303-305

The Food and Drug Administration Agrees to Classify Mercury Fillings

Richard Edlich
Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emanual Hospital; and Plastic Surgery, Biomedical Engineering and Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, USA
Catherine L. Cross
Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
Courtney A. Wack
Legacy Emanuel Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
William B. Long III
Trauma Specialists LLP, Legacy Verified Level I Shock Trauma Center for Pediatrics and Adults, Legacy Emmanuel Hospital Portland, OR, USA
Anthony T. Newkirk
Synergy Dental, Portland, OR, USA

ABSTRACT

In the United States Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit, the Appellants Mom's Against Mercury, Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, Oregonians for Life, California Citizens for Health Freedom, Kevin J. Biggers, Karen Johnson, Linda Brocato, R. Andrew Landerman, and Antia Vazquez Tibaul filed a petition for review of Regulatory Inaction by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On Monday June 2, 2008, the lawsuit was settled with the FDA after it agreed to classify mercury fillings. During its negotiation session with the Appellants, the FDA indicated that it would change its website on mercury fillings. The FDA no longer claims that no science exists about the safety of mercury amalgam or that other countries have acted for environmental reasons only. On its website, the FDA now states the following: "Dental amalgams contain mercury, which may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetus." The FDA also states that "Pregnant women and persons who may have a health condition that makes them more sensitive to mercury exposure, including individuals with existing high levels of mercury bioburden, should not avoid seeking dental care, but should discuss options with their health practitioner." The FDA decision to classify mercury fillings is a reflection of the legislations enacted in Europe and Canada that highlight the neurotoxic effects of mercury fillings.


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