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Forum on Immunopathological Diseases and Therapeutics
SJR: 0.309 SNIP: 0.041 CiteScore™: 0.18

ISSN Print: 2151-8017
ISSN Online: 2151-8025

Archives: Volume 1, 2010 to Volume 7, 2016

Forum on Immunopathological Diseases and Therapeutics

DOI: 10.1615/ForumImmunDisTher.2015013955
pages 47-67

Adoptive Immunotherapy of Cancer Using Chimeric Antigen Receptor−Engineered T Cells

Daniela Achkova
King's College London, King's Health Partners Integrated Cancer Centre, Department of Research Oncology, Guy's Hospital Campus, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK
John Maher
King's College London, King's Health Partners Integrated Cancer Centre, Department of Research Oncology, Guy's Hospital Campus, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK; Department of Immunology, Barnet Hospital, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, Barnet

ABSTRACT

The use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to redirect T cells against tumor-associated antigen targets is a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy. Recently, published phase I clinical trials and case reports suggest that this strategy has the potential to transform modern management of patients with B-cell-derived hematologic malignancies. Indeed, few precedents for novel therapies have achieved comparable therapeutic efficacy when evaluated for the first time in patients with otherwise untreatable malignant disease. One of several arising questions is how this impressive "proof of concept" can be extended to the treatment of solid tumors, which account for the vast majority of the cancer burden. Additional issues about the safety and potential for widespread use of this approach also remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize recent developments in the preclinical and early-phase clinical evaluation of CAR T-cell immunotherapy. We also discuss some of the obstacles to the broader clinical development of this exciting new therapeutic modality and how current preclinical studies are attempting to address these shortcomings.


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