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Atomization and Sprays
IF: 1.737 5-Year IF: 1.518 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 2.2

ISSN Print: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

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Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v15.i6.10
pages 603-628

ELECTROSTATIC EFFECTS ON AGRICULTURAL AIR-ATOMIZED SPRAYS AND DEPOSITION. PART I: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

M. R. Jahannama
Atomization and Sprays Research Group, Mechanical, Aeronautical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, UMIST, Manchester M60 1QD, UK
A. Paul Watkins
Energy and Multiphysics Research Group, School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineer- ing, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Andrew J. Yule
Spray Research Group (SRG), Insititute of Materials Research (IMR), School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Manchester, UK; Thermofluids Division, Department of Mechanical Engineering, UMIST

ABSTRACT

This article reports on an experimental investigation of inductively charged sprays used in crop spraying. Two-phase fluid mechanics and electric measurements are employed to provide an interdisciplinary basis for the electro-hydrodynamic characterization of the sprays. The charged sprays are produced using an air-atomizing induction-charging nozzle, which is convenient and practical for the electrification of aqueous liquids. The study comprises the examination of free-spray and deposition aspects of charged and uncharged sprays. The spray structures are characterized based on the drop size and velocity data obtained using laser-based techniques. The deposition study is further concerned with spectrophotometry analysis to quantify the drop residue on a grounded target. The charging characteristics of charged sprays are evaluated through the spray electric current and flow rate measurements, providing the spray specific charge. Test results demonstrate the dominance of aerodynamic effects within the charged free sprays, whereas, in the vicinity of a grounded target, the sprays are influenced by the attractive electrostatic force fields created, leading to greater drop depositions on the target.


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