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Atomization and Sprays
IF: 1.262 5-Year IF: 1.518 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 1.6

ISSN Print: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

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Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v14.i5.30
18 pages

FLASH ATOMIZATION OF WATER/ACETONE SOLUTIONS

Tevfik Gemci
Synergy CFD Consulting LLC
K. Yakut
Spray Systems Technology Center, Mechanical Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Norman Chigier
Department of Mechanical Engineering Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
T. C. Ho
Corporate Strategic Research Labs, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, New Jersey, USA

ABSTRACT

This work examines flash atomization of water and water/acetone by varying the relative concentrations of propellant gas and liquid, injection temperature, and pressure. Breakup pattern and spray quality were characterized by taking images at the nozzle exit. Mean droplet diameters were measured as a function of operating conditions. It is shown that acetone as a propellant liquid can significantly enhance the atomization of water. Further enhancement can be achieved by adding a propellant gas (nitrogen). For a given mean drop size, the presence of the propellant liquid can markedly reduce the propellant gas-to-liquid ratio. This result has a direct bearing on the atomization of heavy hydrocarbon liquids with injectors subject to propellant gas and/or pressure constraints.