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Atomization and Sprays
IF: 1.262 5-Year IF: 1.518 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 1.6

ISSN Print: 1044-5110
ISSN Online: 1936-2684

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Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.v11.i6.60
10 pages

PULSED SPRAYS FROM OVERSIZED ORIFICES FOR INCREASED MOMENTUM AND KINETIC ENERGY IN DEPOSITING AGRICULTURAL SPRAYS

D. Ken Giles
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California—Davis, Bainer Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
P. G. Andersen
Application Technology Group, Hardi International A/S, Taastrup, Denmark
M. Nilars
Application Technology Group, Hardi International A/S, Taastrup, Denmark

ABSTRACT

Increasing spray deposition while reducing inadvertent off-target movement is critical with agricultural sprays for field protection of crops. Pulsed flow can increase droplet velocity and energy while maintaining desired droplet size spectra from simple-orifice atomizers. Droplet size spectra and velocities were measured using a phase Doppler laser system for hydraulic atomizing nozzles producing liquid flow of 1.1 liters/min while pressurized at 50–670 kPa. Typical spray cloud volume median diameters ranged from 210 to 337 mm. Droplet velocities in the droplet diameter range of 150 to 400 mm were increased by 3- to 4-fold, corresponding to a 9- to 16-fold increase in kinetic energy of the spray droplets in that size range. The cumulative momentum and kinetic energy of the entire spray cloud were increased by 2-fold and 4.4-fold, respectively. The results confirmed that droplet size spectra could be maintained for adequate target coverage while droplet velocities could be increased to reduce droplet flight times and provide greater kinetic energy for deposition.


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