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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v12.i2.20
pages 123-132

Comparative Examination of Polysaccharide Synthesis by Medicinal Mushrooms from the Genus Lentinus Fr. (Agaricomycetideae)

Tatiana A. Puchkova
Institute of Microbiology, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk 220141, Belarus
Victor V. Shcherba
Institute of Microbiology, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, 220141, Belarus
Valentina G. Babitskaya
Institute of Microbiology, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk, 220141, Belarus

ABSTRACT

The effect of culture conditions on growth and polysaccharide production by Lentinus edodes, L. lepideus, and L. tigrinus was investigated. These fungi accumulated 11.2−14.0 g/L biomass, 2.0−5.0 g/L exopolysaccharides, and 4.0%−10.2% endopolysaccharides on optimal glucose-peptone media. The maximum amount of endopolysaccharides (9.5%−10.2%) was found in L. lepideus biomass, whereas the highest level of exopolysaccharide synthesis (4.5−5.0 g/L) was observed in L. edodes. The specific growth rate of the fungi (μ) equaled 0.010 g/L for L. edodes, 0.020 g/L for L. lepideus, and 0.025 g/L for L. tigrinus; productivity of exopolysaccharide synthesis: 550, 300, and 500 mg/L per day, respectively; and productivity of endopolysaccharide synthesis: 40, 170, and 140 mg/L per day respectively. Fungal polysaccharides combined both high-molecular-weight fractions (Mr = 200−2000 kDa) and low-molecular-weight fractions (Mr < 10 kDa). As to carbohydrate composition, polysaccharides of investigated fungi were identified as heteroglycans, with glucose as the dominant monomer and minor amounts of arabinose, galactose, xylose, and mannose. For physical-chemical properties, a close similarity was shown between the polysaccharides of L. tigrinus and L. edodes.


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