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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
IF: 1.423 5-Year IF: 1.525 SJR: 0.433 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Print: 1521-9437
ISSN Online: 1940-4344

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2018025995
pages 445-450

Traditional Knowledge of Gucchi, Morchella esculenta (Ascomycetes), in Doda District, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Narinder Paul
Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) Doda Division of Agriculture Extension Education, KVK Kathua Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Jammu Chatha, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India
P. S. Slathia
Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) Doda Division of Agriculture Extension Education, KVK Kathua Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Jammu Chatha, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India
Amrish Vaid
Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) Doda Division of Agriculture Extension Education, KVK Kathua Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Jammu Chatha, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India
Rakesh Kumar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) Doda Division of Agriculture Extension Education, KVK Kathua Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Jammu Chatha, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India

ABSTRACT

The gucchi mushroom, Morchella esculenta, commonly known as the morel, is called thunthoo in the Bhaderwahi dialect spoken in District Doda of Jammu and Kashmir, India, and is an expensive food item that grows wild and is collected manually. Its nutritive and medicinal values are acknowledged. The farming community in the district traditionally collects the mushroom from forested areas through a well-managed community approach. Elders of families and communities have taught farmers how to identify the mushroom, recognize distribution patterns, and collect it. The knowledge and ability to differentiate M. esculenta from other poisonous wild mushrooms has also been inherited from the elders and community members. Women and children collect it from the outskirts of the forested areas and villages; men penetrate deeper into the dense forests in groups. It is either sold fresh to local shopkeepers or dried at home; the majority of gucchi collectors do the latter. Traditionally, the mushrooms are most commonly dried in the sun or the kitchen. The mushroom fetches a remunerative price and supplements the household incomes of the rural folk who collect it. Marketing gucchi has not been reported as a constraint. It has traditionally been used to overcome gastric problems and indigestion, as a tonic, to help heal wounds, and to reduce joint pain. Its medicinal uses are, however, restricted to only the hills and far-flung areas.


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