Library Subscription: Guest
Begell Digital Portal Begell Digital Library eBooks Journals References & Proceedings Research Collections
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.117 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.17

ISSN Print: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.v18.i2.20
pages 107-116

Systematic Review of Single-Set Versus Multiple-Set Resistance-Training Randomized Controlled Trials: Implications for Rehabilitation

Christopher J. Durall
University of Wisconsin−La Crosse, Department of Health Professions, Physical Therapy Program
Daniel Hermsen
AEGIS Therapies, Papillion, NE
Christopher Demuth
Memorial Community Hospital, Blair, NE

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing strength gains following single-set (SS) and multiple-set (MS) resistance-training protocols was performed to formulate therapeutic exercise recommendations. Methods: Systematic search of Cumulative Nursing and Allied Health Index (CINAHL) and MEDLINE databases for RCTs published between January 1980 and January 2003. Main Outcome Measures: Methodological quality scores based on 10 predetermined criteria, with 100% (10/10) indicating highest quality. Results: Quality scores of the 12 reviewed studies ranged from 50% (moderate quality) to 100% (high quality). Seven studies suggest that MS protocols are superior (MS > SS), and 5 suggest there is no difference in strength gains between SS and MS designs (MS = SS). Mean quality scores were 80.0% (high quality) for the pooled MS > SS studies and 70.0% (high quality) for the pooled MS = SS studies. Conclusions: The higher number of MS > SS studies and slightly higher quality of these pooled studies suggests that MS protocols are more effective for healthy individuals. None of these studies involved patients undergoing rehabilitation; thus, it remains to be seen if the inherently greater time, cost, and presumed injury risk with MS protocols is justified for therapeutic exercise.


Articles with similar content:

The Effects of Phenol Nerve and Muscle Blocks in Treating Spasticity: Review of the Literature
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol.8, 1996, issue 1-2
Heleen Beckerman, Gustaaf J. Lankhorst, Jules Becher, Andre L. M. Verbeek
Effectiveness of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy following Total Hip and Knee Replacements
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.29, 2019, issue 1
Videshnandan Raut, Hosam E. Matar, Nicholas Emms
Nerve Transfer or Musculotendinous Transfer for Elbow Flexion: What Is the Evidence? A Systematic Review
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol.24, 2012, issue 3-4
Wendy K.Y. Ng, Manraj Nirmal Kaur, Sophocles H. Voineskos, Achilleas Thoma
Cost-Effectiveness of Rehabilitation After Spinal Cord Injury
Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol.10, 1998, issue 4
Jason N. Doctor, Diana D. Cardenas
Metalwork Prominence and Operative Interventions for Treating Olecranon Fractures: Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.28, 2018, issue 4
Hosam E. Matar, Stephen P. Duckett, David J. Miller