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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.17

ISSN Print: 0896-2960
ISSN Online: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.2017024475
pages 271-281

Upper Extremity Assessment in Children with Physical Impairments Receiving Intensive Rehabilitative Therapy in a Community Setting

Rakel M. Zarb
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
Jacob R. Rammer
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Engineering Center (OREC), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
Christy Osborn
Bay Cliff Health Camp Children's Therapy and Wellness Center, Big Bay, MI
Roger A. Daley
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sergey Tarima
Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
Gerald F. Harris
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Engineering Center (OREC), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI

ABSTRACT

This prospective study examined upper extremity (UE) assessment results in a pediatric community setting and evaluated whether significant kinematic (motion) and functional changes would be observed after rehabilitative intervention. Children with physical impairments (n = 34) receiving 3 weeks of intensive therapy at a health camp completed pre-/postintervention assessments. The assessments included both an UE motion analysis system and the Shriners Hospital for Children Upper Extremity Evaluation (SHUEE). Chart review provided demographic and health background information. Therapeutic intervention was documented and included descriptive functional assessments. Linear regression was used to examine changes after 3 weeks of intensive therapy. There were significant improvements in all three components of the SHUEE for the affected UE. Ranges of motion increased across eight of 10 tasks measured by motion analysis (p < 0.01). We conclude that intensive therapy in a community setting improves UE functional scores and increases ranges of motion in children with physical impairments.


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