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VALIDATION OF SECOND-ORDER MOMENT TURBULENCE MODELS USING LARGE EDDY SIMULATION AND EXPERIMENTS FOR TURBULENT TWO-PHASE FLOWS

Bernd Groh
Chair of Energy and Powerplant Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Darmstadt University of Technology Petersenstr. 30, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany

Mouldi Chrigui
Chair of Energy and Powerplant Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Darmstadt University of Technology Petersenstr. 30, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany

Zdravko Stojanovic
Chair of Energy and Powerplant Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Darmstadt University of Technology Petersenstr. 30, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany

Amsini Sadiki
Institute of Energy and Power Plant Technology, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany

Andreas Dreizler
Institute for Reactive Flows and Diagnostics, Center of Smart Interface Department of Mechanical Engineering, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, 64287 Darmstadt

Johannes Janicka
Institute of Energy and Power Plant Technology, TU Darmstadt, Jovanka-Bontschits-Strasse 2, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany; Darmstadt Graduate School of Excellence Energy Science and Engineering, TU Darmstadt, Jovanka-Bontschits-Strasse 2, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany

Abstract

Both, numerical results obtained with Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and experimental data are used to validate Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations. These are performed to study the phenomenon of augmentation and attenuation of fluid turbulence due to the presence of dispersed particles, known as turbulence modulation. An Eulerian/ Lagrangian treatment is used, in which the dispersed properties are obtained from tracking discrete particles in a dilute two-phase flow.
In particular the effect of varied diameters and different volumetric loading ratios are investigated. The modulation model presented in Chrigui et al. (2003) captures well the attenuation and the augmentation of the induced turbulence. Small particles of 120 µm diameter attenuate the fluid turbulence, while particles of 480 µm- diameter generate fluid turbulence. Varied volumetric loading ratios for particles of 120 µm diameter show, that a lower volumetric loading ratio tend to attenuate the fluid turbulence towards a flow without tracked particles. This trend is confirmed with energy power-spectra from experiments and LES.