Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.905 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN En Línea: 1940-431X

Volumes:
Volumen 26, 2020 Volumen 25, 2019 Volumen 24, 2018 Volumen 23, 2017 Volumen 22, 2016 Volumen 21, 2015 Volumen 20, 2014 Volumen 19, 2013 Volumen 18, 2012 Volumen 17, 2011 Volumen 16, 2010 Volumen 15, 2009 Volumen 14, 2008 Volumen 13, 2007 Volumen 12, 2006 Volumen 11, 2005 Volumen 10, 2004 Volumen 9, 2003 Volumen 8, 2002 Volumen 7, 2001 Volumen 6, 2000 Volumen 5, 1999 Volumen 4, 1998 Volumen 3, 1997 Volumen 2, 1995 Volumen 1, 1994

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2012002317
pages 153-178

KEEPING THE GIRLS VISIBLE IN K−12 SCIENCE EDUCATION REFORM EFFORTS: A FEMINIST CASE STUDY ON PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING

Gayle A. Buck
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Indiana University, W.W. Wright Education Building, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Nicole M. Beeman-Cadwallader
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Indiana University, W.W. Wright Education Building, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Amy E. Trauth-Nare
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Indiana University, W.W. Wright Education Building, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

SINOPSIS

Research has provided us with valuable understandings of girls' experiences in traditional classrooms, yet little is known about their experiences with contemporary reform efforts that alter these classrooms. The purpose of this feminist case study was to provide a descriptive, as well as interpretive, account of seventh-grade girls' cognitive and procedural engagement in a problem-based Earth and space unit, specifically focusing on how various instructional strategies influenced engagement. We addressed the question: What aspects of the problem-based learning (PBL) instructional approach fostered or hindered the girls' procedural and cognitive engagement in science education. The final analysis revealed four broad themes. These themes articulate connections among girls' levels and types of engagement and (1) interpersonal aspects of PBL instruction, (2) level of task structure, (3) technology-enhanced approaches, and (4) authentic contexts in PBL instruction. The findings from this case study contribute to an understanding of the impact of science education reform effort on girls' participation and offer possible directions for making this effort more conducive to girls' needs.


Articles with similar content:

AN EARLY INTERVENTION TO ENCOURAGE GIRLS’ INTEREST IN CAREERS IN DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION: MORE THAN IMPROVING SCIENCE ACHIEVEMENT AND ATTITUDES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.18, 2012, issue 4
Sondra Redmont, Michelle Natasya Johnson, Caroline E. Reid, Carl G. Leukefeld, Mitzi M. Schumacher
INTERSECTIONALITY AS A FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING DIVERSE YOUNG WOMEN'S COMMITMENT TO ENGINEERING
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.21, 2015, issue 1
Jill Bystydzienski, Margaret Eisenhart, Monica J. Bruning
STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF INSTRUCTION, PEER INTEREST, AND ADULT SUPPORT FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE: DIFFERENCES BY RACE AND GENDER
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.4, 1998, issue 4
Jane Butler Kahle, William J. Boone
PATHS TO SUCCESS: AN EVALUATION OF THE GATEWAY TO HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.4, 1998, issue 2&3
Ellen Wahl, Elisabeth Iler, Babette Moeller, Patricia B. Campbell, Daniel Light, Morton Slater, Harouna Ba
INDIVIDUAL AND NEIGHBORHOOD EFFECTS OF RACE/ETHNICITY AND SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS ON PARTICIPATION AND PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE CALCULUS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.22, 2016, issue 4
Melissa D. Barnett, Gerhard Sonnert, Philip M. Sadler