Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN En Línea: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v21.i4.40
pages 347-362

PREDICTING DEGREE ATTAINMENT IN ENGINEERING AND BIOLOGICAL/LIFE SCIENCES: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY

Hesborn O. Wao
Comparative Effectiveness Research, USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 3515 East Fletcher Avenue, MDT1200 Tampa, Florida 33612
Reginald S. Lee
David C. Anchin Center, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33620
Joel Ochieng Wao
Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science, Tuskegee University, 1200 West Montgomery Road, Tuskegee, Alabama 36088
Georgiadis Owuor Odondi
School of Physical Sciences, CBPS, University of Nairobi, Box 30197-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Emily Akoth Tenge
School of Arts & Social Science, Rongo University College, Moi University P.O. Box 103-40404, Rongo, Kenya
Chrystal A.S. Smith
University of Connecticut

SINOPSIS

Using the 1996−1997 Florida high school graduating cohort, the relationships among a number of factors predictive of attaining a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate degree are examined. Women were found to be less likely than men to attain a STEM degree or an engineering degree but more likely to attain a biological/life sciences degree. Compared to Whites, Asians were twice as likely to attain a STEM degree and Blacks were one and a half times as likely to attain a STEM degree. The longer a student spent pursuing the degree, the higher were the odds of STEM or engineering degree attainment but the lower were the odds of a biological/ life sciences degree attainment. Higher high school grade point average scores were associated with higher odds of STEM degree or engineering degree attainment. While in college, when the number of quarters of work was higher the odds of either STEM or engineering degree attainment were lower but the odds of biological/life sciences degree attainment were higher. The relationships between the annual salaries earned while in college and STEM, engineering, or biological/life sciences degree attainments are mixed.


Articles with similar content:

GENDER-BIASED SELF-EVALUATIONS OF FIRST-YEAR ENGINEERING STUDENTS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.21, 2015, issue 3
Anna Woodcock, Diana Bairaktarova
PARTNERING WITH TEACHERS TO EDUCATE GIRLS IN THE NEW COMPUTER AGE
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.10, 2004, issue 2
Lisa K. Kearney, Melinda J. Bravo, Lucia Albino Gilbert
SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS, MOTIVATION, RACE, AND GENDER IN MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.7, 2001, issue 4
Frank Pajares, Shari L. Britner
AN EARLY INTERVENTION TO ENCOURAGE GIRLS’ INTEREST IN CAREERS IN DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION: MORE THAN IMPROVING SCIENCE ACHIEVEMENT AND ATTITUDES
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.18, 2012, issue 4
Sondra Redmont, Michelle Natasya Johnson, Caroline E. Reid, Carl G. Leukefeld, Mitzi M. Schumacher
PATHS TO SUCCESS: AN EVALUATION OF THE GATEWAY TO HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.4, 1998, issue 2&3
Ellen Wahl, Elisabeth Iler, Babette Moeller, Patricia B. Campbell, Daniel Light, Morton Slater, Harouna Ba