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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimir: 1072-8325
ISSN En Línea: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v11.i2.10
pages 117-138

UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN'S PARTICIPATION IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Harriet Hartman
Department of Sociology, Rowan University, Glassboro, New Jersey 08028, USA
Moshe Hartman
Rowan University, Department of Sociology, 201 Mullica Hill Rd., Glassboro, NJ 08028

SINOPSIS

This article focuses on the differences among female undergraduate engineering students who choose to affiliate with student chapters of discipline-specific, mixed-gender professional organizations, the student chapter of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), or not to affiliate at all. Participants in the different kinds of organizations are compared to nonparticipants to explore how participation is related to professionalization and the development of engineering social capital. Compared with nonparticipants, participants were more involved in extracurricular enrichment and "help" activities; they were more satisfied with most aspects of the engineering program; they had higher grades; they were more self-confident about themselves as engineers, and by the end of the academic year, about their engineering competencies; and they were more strongly committed to a future in engineering. Participation in SWE was associated with greater involvement in study activities, higher satisfaction with the coursework load, and a different perception of the problems women face in the field. Data were taken from a survey of engineering students at Rowan University during the 2000−2001 academic year, which was funded by the National Science Foundation.


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