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Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology
Factor de Impacto: 1.241 Factor de Impacto de 5 años: 1.349 SJR: 0.356 SNIP: 0.613 CiteScore™: 1.61

ISSN Imprimir: 0731-8898
ISSN En Línea: 2162-6537

Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology

DOI: 10.1615/JEnvPathToxOncol.v24.i3.60
pages 201-210

Use of Black Tea in Modulating Clastogenic Effects of Arsenic in Mice In Vivo

Manomita Patra
Department of Biochemistry, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India
Ajanta Halder
Department of Genetics, Vivekananda Institute of Medical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Seva Pratisthan, Kolkata, India
Niladri Bhowmik
Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Pundibari, Coochbehar, West Bengal, India
Madhusnata De
Department of Genetics, Vivekananda Institute of Medical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Seva Pratisthan, Kolkata, India

SINOPSIS

The concentration of arsenic in drinking water has far exceeded the permissible limit of 0.001 mg/L and has reached epidemic proportions, with a maximum of 3.7 mg/L in several districts of West Bengal and in the adjoining Bangladesh. Because inorganic arsenic is a documented human carcinogen, arsenic in drinking water may cause 200,000-270,000 deaths per year from cancer in India alone. Tea has a protective effect against the clastogenicity of arsenic. We investigated whether tea extracts could protect against the damage caused by arsenic in vivo. Our experiments were carried out with black tea in mice with the end points of incidence of chromosomal aberrations and damaged cells. Analysis of variance of chromosomal aberrations showed a significant difference in the toxic effects of arsenic, which were reduced by tea infusion. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations was close to the corresponding effects of tea alone. Continued dietary administration of black tea infusion protects against the chromosome-damaging effects of sodium arsenite at a statistically significant level. The degree of protection increases with duration of tea consumption, which may be attributed to the antioxidant and scavenging properties of tea infusion.


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