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Critical Reviews™ in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems
Factor de Impacto: 2.9 Factor de Impacto de 5 años: 3.72 SJR: 0.573 SNIP: 0.551 CiteScore™: 2.43

ISSN Imprimir: 0743-4863
ISSN En Línea: 2162-660X

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Critical Reviews™ in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevTherDrugCarrierSyst.2016016167
pages 195-212

Niosomes as Nano-Delivery Systems in the Pharmaceutical Field

Cristal Cerqueira
Instituto de Macromoléculas UFRJ
Elisabete P. dos Santos
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Drugs and Medicines, Laboratorio de Desenvolvimento Galenico (LADEG), Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Claudia Regina E. Mansur
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Institute of Macromolecules, Center of Technology, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

SINOPSIS

Nanosystems used in the pharmaceutical field aim to guarantee a controlled release and efficacy boost with dose reduction of the drug. The same active ingredient could be vehiculated in different concentrations in distinct nanosystems. Among these nanostructures, the vesicular ones present a versatile delivery system that could be applied to encapsulate lipophilic, amphiphilic, and hydrophilic compounds. Liposomes are the most well-known vesicular nanosystems; however, there are others, such as niosomes, that are composed of nonionic surfactants that are polymeric or conventional. Niosomes could be prepared using the thin film hydration method, in which the active ingredient is solubilized in organic solvent with the surfactant or in aqueous solution depending on its polarity. In addition, co-surfactants could be used to improve stabilization and vesicle integrity because they occupy regions in the interface where the mainly surfactant could not reach. Vesicular nanosystems could be characterized by different techniques, such as microscopy, dynamic light scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance, and others. These nanostructures could be applied to drugs (administered by different routes) or to gene and cosmetic delivery systems.


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