Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering
SJR: 0.26 SNIP: 0.375 CiteScore™: 1.4

ISSN Imprimir: 0278-940X
ISSN En Línea: 1943-619X

Volumes:
Volumen 48, 2020 Volumen 47, 2019 Volumen 46, 2018 Volumen 45, 2017 Volumen 44, 2016 Volumen 43, 2015 Volumen 42, 2014 Volumen 41, 2013 Volumen 40, 2012 Volumen 39, 2011 Volumen 38, 2010 Volumen 37, 2009 Volumen 36, 2008 Volumen 35, 2007 Volumen 34, 2006 Volumen 33, 2005 Volumen 32, 2004 Volumen 31, 2003 Volumen 30, 2002 Volumen 29, 2001 Volumen 28, 2000 Volumen 27, 1999 Volumen 26, 1998 Volumen 25, 1997 Volumen 24, 1996 Volumen 23, 1995

Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevBiomedEng.v28.i12.270
pages 159-163

Development of Fiber Optic and Electrochemical pH Sensors to Monitor Brain Tissue

Sheila A. Grant
Center for Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Ml
Kerry Bettencourt
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA
Peter Krulevitch
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA
Julie Hamilton
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA
Robert Glass
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA

SINOPSIS

This article describes fiber optic and electrochemical pH sensors that could become part of a therapeutic arsenal to quickly and aggressively treat stroke victims as well as people who have suffered brain trauma. The fiber optic sensor design was based on the immobilization of a pH-sensitive dye, seminaphthorhodamine-1 carboxylate (SNARF-1C), onto the end of a 125-mm-diameter silica optical fiber using the sol-gel method. A miniature bench-top fluorimeter system was developed for use with the optical fiber to obtain pH measurements. The electrochemical sensor was based on sputter-coated indium oxide thin films. Linear and reproducible responses for both sensors were obtained in human blood with pH varying between 6.8 to 8.0, which encompasses the clinically relevant range. In vivo studies were also performed and results indicated that both types of sensors tracked pH with very little drift.


Articles with similar content:

Development of Scanning Thermal Microscopy for Nano-scale Real Temperature Measurement
International Heat Transfer Conference 12, Vol.2, 2002, issue
Osamu Nakabeppu, Takamitsu Suzuki
Toward a Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Immunosensor Design for Quantifying Cortisol in Tears
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering, Vol.47, 2019, issue 3
Brittney A. Cardinell, Mark L. Spano, Jeffrey T. La Belle
Technique to Quantify Subsurface Cracks in Retrieved Polyethylene Components Using Micro-CT
Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants, Vol.20, 2010, issue 1
David W. Holdsworth, Matthew G Teeter, Xunhua Yuan, Douglas D. R. Naudie
ORGANICS ADSORPTION ON NOVEL AMORPHOUS SILICA AND SILICA XEROGELS: MICROCOLUMN RAPID BREAKTHROUGH TEST COUPLED WITH SEQUENTIAL INJECTION ANALYSIS
Journal of Porous Media, Vol.22, 2019, issue 8
Gemma Turnes Palomino, Ashleigh J. Fletcher, Fernando Maya Alejandro, Andrea Luca Tasca, Farnaz Ghajeri
CHARACTERIZING 5.56-mm CARTRIDGE PERFORMANCE WITH NOVEL MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
International Journal of Energetic Materials and Chemical Propulsion, Vol.12, 2013, issue 4
John J. Ritter