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Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.278 SNIP: 0.183 CiteScore™: 0.57

ISSN Imprimir: 1947-5764
ISSN En Línea: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2014011602
pages 259-265

A Pilot Study of Atmospheric Nonthermal Plasma Jet Application on Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

Wenhui Du
Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Chunjun Yang
Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Cheng Cheng
Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Jie Shen
Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Jilu Shen
Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Shumei Zhang
Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Shi Chen
Department of Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Longdan Liu
Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Jing Gao
Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Shengxiu Liu
Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China
Shenghai Huang
Department of Microbiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People's Republic of China

SINOPSIS

Background: Infectious skin diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis continue to increase worldwide even with management by current infection control methods. Novel methods for disinfecting these drug-resistant strains would be useful. We experimentally tested the effectiveness of nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets at killing S. aureus and S. epidermidis in in vitro settings. Methods: The strains of S. aureus and S. epidermidis were propagated in tryptic soy agar plates after isolation and cultivation, and all of the plates were then exposed to nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets for varying lengths of time (10, 20, 40, 60, 180, and 300 seconds). The colony forming units were quantified after 48-hour incubation at 37°C. Results: Exposure of S. aureus and S. epidermidis to nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets at different lengths of time resulted in all strains killed on tryptic soy agar plates within 3 minutes. Conclusions: The nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet is a promising instrument in controlling skin infection disease, which warrants further study in dermatology.