Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
Plasma Medicine
SJR: 0.271 SNIP: 0.316 CiteScore™: 1.9

ISSN Imprimir: 1947-5764
ISSN En Línea: 1947-5772

Plasma Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/PlasmaMed.2013008538
pages 71-80

Viability of Human Blood Leukocytes Compared with Their Respective Cell Lines after Plasma Treatment

Lena Bundscherer
Center for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Greifswald, Germany
Sander Bekeschus
Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), ZIK Plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany
Helena Tresp
Centre for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Greifswald; Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology INP Greifswald e.V., Greifswald, Germany
Sybille Hasse
Center for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Greifswald, Germany
Stephan Reuter
Center for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Greifswald, Germany
Klaus-Dieter Weltmann
Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), ZIK Plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany
Ulrike Lindequist
Institute of Pharmacy, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald F.-L.-Jahn-Str. 17, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany
Kai Masur
Center for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Greifswald, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Greifswald, Germany

SINOPSIS

Non-thermal plasma application has become a promising field of investigation in chronic wound healing research over the past few decades. In addition to its well-characterized antibacterial effects, plasma potentially promotes the growth of eukaryotic cells. To date, mainly epithelial skin cells have been examined regarding the impact of plasma treatment on chronic wound healing. However, immune cells also are involved in wound healing as well as the removal of pathogens. Therefore, we compared the survival behavior of 2 human leukocyte cell lines (a monocyte and a CD4+ T helper cell line) and their respective human blood counterparts after exposure to plasma. Measurements of early and late apoptotic cells demonstrate that freshly isolated blood cells were more susceptible to apoptosis induction than the cell lines. Furthermore, blood and cell line monocytes tolerated longer plasma exposure compared with blood and cell line CD4+ T helper cells.


Articles with similar content:

Structure of IL-10 and Its Role in Autoimmune Exocrinopathy
Critical Reviews™ in Immunology, Vol.20, 2000, issue 2
Ichiro Saito
The Role of T Cells in Kawasaki Disease
Critical Reviews™ in Immunology, Vol.15, 1995, issue 3-4
Raphael Hirsch, Jaime de Inocencio
Dendritic Cell Cross Talk with Innate and Innate-like Effector Cells in Antitumor Immunity: Implications for DC Vaccination
Critical Reviews™ in Immunology, Vol.34, 2014, issue 6
I. Jolanda M. de Vries, Jasper J. P. van Beek, Annette E. Skold, Stanleyson V. Hato, Florian Wimmers
T Lymphocytes and Their Cytokines in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Implications for Associated Neoplasias
Critical Reviews™ in Oncogenesis, Vol.6, 1995, issue 3-6
Christian Jassoy, Bruce D. Walker
Naturally Occurring Regulatory T Cells: Recent Insights in Health and Disease
Critical Reviews™ in Immunology, Vol.27, 2007, issue 1
Penelope A. Morel, Giorgio Raimondi, Michael S. Turner, Angus W. Thomson