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Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression
Factor de Impacto: 1.841 Factor de Impacto de 5 años: 1.927 SJR: 0.649 SNIP: 0.516 CiteScore™: 1.96

ISSN Imprimir: 1045-4403
ISSN En Línea: 2162-6502

Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevEukarGeneExpr.v11.i4.40
16 pages

Angiostatic Proteins and Peptides

Jessica C. A. Bouma-ter Steege
Tumor Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands
Kevin H. Mayo
Department of Biochemistry, University of Minnesota, Health Sciences Center, 435 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Arjan W. Griffioen
Tumor Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands

SINOPSIS

Angiogenesis, or the formation of new vasculature out of preexisting capillaries, is a sequence of events that is essential in the normal physiological processes of tissue growth and in a broad spectrum of pathologies. The diseases in which angiogenesis plays a key role are divided into diseases that are characterized by hypoxia/ischemia and diseases that are dependent on neovascularization. The former pathologies may benefit from therapeutic angiogenesis stimulation. This review concentrates on the different strategies to inhibit angiogenesis in diseases that are characterized by excessive angiogenesis, for example, cancer, arthritis, diabetic retinopathy, and inflammatory diseases. These diseases are dependent on the development of new vasculature, and hence, a large variety of different strategies to inhibit angiogenesis are under way in laboratories throughout the world. At present, over 250 angiogenesis inhibitors are described, and approximately half of them display activity in in vivo models. A large percentage of these molecules are natural, nonnatural, or synthetic so-called small molecules. Others are of protein origin, either endogenous or exogenous by nature. The authors highlight the current knowledge on the development of angiostatic proteins and peptides and their potential in the treatment of disease.


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