Suscripción a Biblioteca: Guest
Portal Digitalde Biblioteca Digital eLibros Revistas Referencias y Libros de Ponencias Colecciones
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
Factor de Impacto: 1.423 Factor de Impacto de 5 años: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.661 CiteScore™: 1.38

ISSN Imprimir: 1521-9437
ISSN En Línea: 1940-4344

Volumes:
Volumen 21, 2019 Volumen 20, 2018 Volumen 19, 2017 Volumen 18, 2016 Volumen 17, 2015 Volumen 16, 2014 Volumen 15, 2013 Volumen 14, 2012 Volumen 13, 2011 Volumen 12, 2010 Volumen 11, 2009 Volumen 10, 2008 Volumen 9, 2007 Volumen 8, 2006 Volumen 7, 2005 Volumen 6, 2004 Volumen 5, 2003 Volumen 4, 2002 Volumen 3, 2001 Volumen 2, 2000 Volumen 1, 1999

International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushr.v10.i4.20
pages 303-313

Sclerotium of Culinary-Medicinal King Tuber Oyster Mushroom, Pleurotus tuberregium (Fr.) Singer (Agaricomycetideae): Its Cultivation, Biochemical Composition, and Biopharmacological Effects (Review)

Ka-Hing Wong
Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
Peter Chi Keung Cheung
School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong, China

SINOPSIS

Among all the different morphological stages of edible mushrooms, the sclerotium is being relatively less reported, compared to the fruiting body and mycelium, in terms of its cultivation and economic importance, as well as its nutritional and medicinal values. Among the sclerotium-producing mushrooms, Wolfiporia cocos, Grifola umbellata, and Omphalia lapidescens were recorded in the ancient Chinese pharmacopedia for their pharmacological effects more than a thousand years ago. Recently, the sclerotial mushroom Pleurotus tuberregium has attracted much attention. This review comprehensively describes the cultivation, biochemical composition, and nutritional values, as well as the biopharmacological effects, of this mushroom sclerotium. Scientific investigations on this mushroom sclerotium over the last 10 years are highlighted. The potential of this mushroom sclerotium to be developed as novel functional foods or nutraceuticals is also discussed.


Articles with similar content:

Medicinal Value of the Genus Tremella Pers. (Heterobasidiomycetes) (Review)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.2, 2000, issue 3
Sergey V. Reshetnikov, Solomon P. Wasser, Ina Duckman, Katherina Tsukor
Effect of Environmental Conditions on Synnema Formation and Nucleoside Production in Cicada Flower, Isaria cicadae (Ascomycetes)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.21, 2019, issue 1
Fen Wang, Guijun Liu, Kuanbo Liu, Caihong Dong
Therapeutic potential of Artemisia vulgaris: An insight into underlying immunological mechanisms
Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology, Vol.38, 2019, issue 3
Laura Soon, Phui Qi Ng, Thiagarajan Madheswaran, Nicole G. Hansbro, Gaurav Gupta, Trudi Collet, Dinesh Kumar Chellappan, Jestin Chellian, Kamal Dua, Saurabh Satija, Harish Dureja, Jithendra Panneerselvam, Alan Hsu, Meenu Mehta, Philip M. Hansbro, Srinivas Nammi
Conservation of Medicinal Mushrooms in the V. L. Komarov Botanical Institute Basidiomycetes Culture Collection (LE-BIN, Russia)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.12, 2010, issue 2
Nadezhda V. Psurtseva
Cultivation of the Edible and Medicinal Mushroom Grifola frondosa (Dicks.:Fr.) S. F. Gray (Maitake)—Relevance of Literature to Production in Australia (Review)
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol.5, 2003, issue 2
Karen Stott