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International Journal of Fluid Mechanics Research
ESCI SJR: 0.206 SNIP: 0.446 CiteScore™: 0.5

ISSN Imprimir: 2152-5102
ISSN En Línea: 2152-5110

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International Journal of Fluid Mechanics Research

DOI: 10.1615/InterJFluidMechRes.v24.i1-3.420
pages 416-427

Unsteady Breakup of Liquid Jets in Coaxial Airblast Atomizers

Yannis Hardalupas
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
R.-F. Tsai
National Hu-wei Institute of Technology (NHIT), Department of Automation Engineering, Hu-wei, Yun-Lin, Taiwan
Jim H. Whitelaw
Thermofluids Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BX, United Kingdom

SINOPSIS

The breakup process of coaxial airblast atomizers, comprising an annular axial air stream with a central liquid jet, was examined with high speed photography over a range of exit Weber numbers from 0 to 2300, air-to-liquid momentum and energy ratios from 0 to 130 and 0 to 11700 respectively, liquid jet Reynolds number from 3000 to 46000 and nozzles with air jet diameter 23, 15 and 9 mm and liquid jets with 2.3 and 1.2 mm. The photographs showed the deterministic unsteadiness of the breakup process leading in the formation of clusters in a nearly periodic manner and quantified the breakup length, frequency, cluster length and velocity, wavelength of the wave responsible for the breakup and the energy transfer from the air to the liquid jet. A simplified breakup model was based on surface waves due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which grow through non-linear processes to form waves with long wavelength relative to the liquid jet diameter.