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Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
SJR: 0.121 SNIP: 0.228 CiteScore™: 0.17

ISSN Imprimir: 0896-2960
ISSN En Línea: 2162-6553

Critical Reviews™ in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevPhysRehabilMed.2016015695
pages 145-157

Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Adults with Hand Trauma: A Systematic Review

Daniel Alexander Waltho
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Manraj Nirmal Kaur
Surgical Outcomes Research Center (SOURCE), Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; School of Rehabilitation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Mary Ellen Gedye
Department of Family Medicine, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
Achilleas Thoma
Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada

SINOPSIS

Several patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are available to determine extent and impact of hand injuries, but it is unclear as to which PROM(s) is(are) appropriate. This systematic review aimed to identify PROMs relevant and valid in traumatic hand injuries and examine their psychometric properties. We searched MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Library, Scopus, PubMed, and Web of Science databases to locate studies published from January 1990 to October 2014 that reported on adults with hand trauma, which included validation testing with the use of a PROM. The initial search strategy resulted in 416 citations, of which we to used eight articles. Nine PROMs were found to be validated in the hand trauma population: Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and two variations of the DASH: Manchester-Modified Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (M2 DASH) and QuickDASH; Michigan Hand Outcomes questionnaire (MHQ); Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity questionnaire (CISS); Cold Sensitivity Severity questionnaire (CSS); Injured Workers Survey (IWS); and Hand Assessment Tool (HAT). Reliability and responsiveness data were also identified. We found that sufficient psychometric results existed only for DASH and MHQ and believe that both should be considered for use with all hand injury cases. CISS or CSS may serve as an adjunctive PROM in geographically cold environments, and the IWS may do so with work-related hand injuries having suspected psychological outcomes.