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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2016013601
pages 91-118

EXPLORING THE MODERATING EFFECTS OF RACE AND ETHNICITY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CURRICULAR AND CLASSROOM EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES IN ENGINEERING

Hyun Kyoung Ro
Higher Education and Student Affairs, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USA
David B. Knight
Department of Engineering Education, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA
Karla I. Loya
Educational Leadership, University of Hartford, West hartford, CT, USA

RÉSUMÉ

Increasing racial/ethnic minority students' success is a challenge for engineering undergraduate education. While studies have focused on students' access, persistence, and degree completion by disaggregating student race/ethnicity, relatively little research has been conducted on the differential relationship between student experiences and learning outcomes across racial groups. Based on Terenzini and Reason's college impact framework (2005, 2011), this study examined how students' race/ethnicity moderates the relationship between student experiences and learning outcomes. This study used student survey data from a nationally representative sample of 120 U.S. engineering programs from 31 four-year institutions and adopted blocked linear regression procedures with interaction effects between students' race/ethnicity and their curricular and classroom experiences on learning outcomes. The results indicated that students' experiences positively related with Asians' and Blacks' learning outcomes relative to Whites' learning on different curricular topics (e.g., core-engineering thinking) that their programs emphasized. While students' experiences on their instructors' student-centered teaching methods had positive and stronger relationships with learning for Asians than for Whites, group learning experiences had a positive relationship with learning for Blacks relative to Whites. These results suggest that more research investigating the relationship between student experiences and learning outcomes across subpopulations of students should be conducted because the same relationships do not appear to hold across racial/ethnic groups within engineering.