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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v4.i2-3.50
pages 141-160

CONDITIONAL EQUITY METRICS AS TOOLS FOR EVALUATING EQUITY IN SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION SYSTEMS

Norman L. Webb
National Institute for Science Education, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, 1025 West Johnson St., Madison, WI53706

RÉSUMÉ

Conditional equity metrics (CEMs) report differences in performance among groups of students given one or more conditions under which that performance may have been influenced. CEMs are a tool for evaluating equity within a school or an education system that takes into account that differences among groups need to be interpreted under a variety of conditions. Most often group differences in learning by ethnicity and sex are reported as aggregated data or "bare" data without specifying the context and other factors under which the learning occurred. When the relevant conditions associated with learning are revealed, such as the type of curriculum or prior achievement, differences among groups can take on different meaning. Data from one high school are used to illustrate the value of CEMs in evaluating equity. Curriculum and prior achievement were used to consider differential mathematics performance on a multiple of outcome measures by ethnicity and sex. Whereas on the average blacks scored lower on all measures, when the curriculum was considered, blacks who had studied a reform mathematics curriculum had a higher mean performance on one measure than all ethnic groups who had studied a traditional mathematics curriculum. These differences could not be explained by prior achievement, thus strengthening the conclusions that high school experiences and the reform curriculum contributed to this finding.


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