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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v4.i2-3.140
pages 297-308

PATHS TO SUCCESS: AN EVALUATION OF THE GATEWAY TO HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM

Patricia B. Campbell
Cambell-Kibler Associates, Inc., Groton, MA
Ellen Wahl
Education Development Center, Inc., Center for Children and Technology, 96 Morton St., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10014
Morton Slater
City University of New York/Gateway, and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, Gateway to Higher Education, The City University of New York Medical School, 94-50 159th Street, Jamaica, NY 11451
Elisabeth Iler
City University of New York/Gateway, and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, Gateway to Higher Education, The City University of New York Medical School, 94-50 159th Street, Jamaica, NY 11451
Babette Moeller
Education Development Center, Inc., Center for Children and Technology, 96 Morton St., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10014
Harouna Ba
Education Development Center, Inc., Center for Children and Technology, 96 Morton St., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10014
Daniel Light
Education Development Center, Inc., Center for Children and Technology, 96 Morton St., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10014

RÉSUMÉ

Despite progress in increasing the representation of minorities in science and mathematics education, the pattern of underrepresentation continues at higher educational levels and in the scientific, engineering, and medical workforce. At the pre-college level, minority students, particularly those who live in urban areas, often do not have access to high-quality educational opportunities that would support their participation in these fields. This study sought to determine whether providing such opportunities, in this case through the Gateway to Higher Education program, made a difference. The research examined longitudinal data collected on all Gateway participants, compared a cohort of Gateway students to a retrospective comparison group, and conducted site visits, focus groups, and interviews. The findings revealed significant differences in high school graduation rates, completion of academic high school courses with an emphasis on mathematics and science courses, strong Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) performance, and college attendance. The study has important implications for educational reform.


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