Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2013004654
pages 329-347

GENDER AND PROMOTION: HOW DO SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS (STEM) FACULTY MEMBERS SURVIVE A FOGGY CLIMATE?

Dina Banerjee
Indian Institute of Management Udaipur
Alice L. Pawley
School of Engineering Education; Affiliate faculty, Women's Studies Program, Division of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA

RÉSUMÉ

In this paper, we describe a case study of four faculty members in an STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) college of a research-oriented Midwestern university. On the basis of certain similarities we situate the faculty members on a common platform to compare and contrast their experiences of the promotion and tenure (P&T) application process. Through this, we examine the impact of gender on worklife experiences of STEM faculty members. We ask: (1) How do STEM faculty members who are successfully tenured or promoted describe the P&T application process? (2) How do institutionally generated P&T policy texts shape these STEM faculty members' approaches to develop successful P&T applications? and (3) How are P&T application experiences gendered for these STEM faculty members? We use interviews with STEM faculty members gathered through a National Science Foundation-funded research project (NSF-HRD 0811194) and qualitatively analyze them using institutional ethnographic methods. Findings suggest that STEM faculty members in this study do not get enough information in terms of their P&T application requirements, and therefore they seek information from many sources. We propose an alternative metaphor of a "foggy climate" to represent these experiences: within their academic careers, these four faculty members encountered a foggy climate of inadequate information regarding P&T policies, and developed "fog lights" of formal and informal resources to light their way. We suggest that the ability to create networks of fog lights may be gendered based on associated work−family conflicts.


Articles with similar content:

USING THE CONSTRUCT OF CARE TO FRAME ENGINEERING AS A CARING PROFESSION TOWARD PROMOTING YOUNG GIRLS' PARTICIPATION
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.20, 2014, issue 1
Brenda M. Capobianco, Ji Hyun Yu
BUSTING OPEN THE MERITOCRACY MYTH: RETHINKING EQUITY AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN SCIENCE EDUCATION
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.4, 1998, issue 2&3
Alberto J. Rodriguez
DEVELOPING EFFECTIVE ENGINEERING FICTIVE KIN TO SUPPORT UNDERGRADUATE FIRST-GENERATION COLLEGE STUDENTS
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.20, 2014, issue 3
Julie P. Martin, Denise R. Simmons
STARTING AT THE CROSSROADS: INTERSECTIONAL APPROACHES TO INSTITUTIONALLY SUPPORTING UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITY WOMEN STEM FACULTY
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.21, 2015, issue 2
Jasna Jovanovic, Mary A. Armstrong
INTERSECTIONALITY AS A FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING DIVERSE YOUNG WOMEN'S COMMITMENT TO ENGINEERING
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, Vol.21, 2015, issue 1
Jill Bystydzienski, Margaret Eisenhart, Monica J. Bruning