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Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
SJR: 0.468 SNIP: 0.671 CiteScore™: 1.65

ISSN Imprimer: 1072-8325
ISSN En ligne: 1940-431X

Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering

DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v11.i1.30
pages 45-60

A SCIENCE PIPELINE PATHWAY FOR TRAINING UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

Lawrence J. Alfred
College of Sciences, San Diego State University; and University of California, San Diego
Cathie Atkins
College of Sciences, San Diego State University; and University of California, San Diego
Michelle Lopez
College of Sciences, San Diego State University; and University of California, San Diego
Thelma Chavez
College of Sciences, San Diego State University; and University of California, San Diego
Vernon Avila
College of Sciences, San Diego State University; and University of California, San Diego
Paul Paolini
College of Sciences, San Diego State University; and University of California, San Diego

RÉSUMÉ

This article describes a science pipeline program designed to increase the number of minority students preparing for future biomedical research careers. This study focused on the importance of undergraduate students' participation in faculty-mentored research projects and on students' decisions to enter graduate school. The academic performance of participating minority students was compared with that of ethnic-specific nonparticipating students and majority nonparticipating students. More than 1,200 San Diego State University minority students were tracked through college. Of 132 who have graduated from two support programs, 53% entered graduate programs, and 39% have already completed advanced degrees. The major factors in a student's decision to enter graduate school in the biomedical sciences were faculty mentoring and his or her participation in faculty research projects. College participants in a California State University system wide mathematics enrichment program showed retention rates of 57% for minorities, 35% for minority nonparticipants, and 46% for majority nonparticipants.