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Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants
SJR: 0.332 SNIP: 0.491 CiteScore™: 0.89

ISSN Imprimer: 1050-6934
ISSN En ligne: 1940-4379

Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants

DOI: 10.1615/JLongTermEffMedImplants.2014010812
pages 171-178

Implant Fracture after Long-Stemmed Cemented Hemiarthroplasty for Oncologic Indications

Aditya V. Maheshwari
Department of Pathology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA
Corey Gilbert
Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street, Washington DC 20010; Department of Orthopaedics, Howard University Hospital, 2041 Georgia Avenue, Washington DC 20060
Jenna Noveau
Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street, Washington DC 20010
Robert Pivec
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center/University Hospital Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY
Robert M. Henshaw
Orthopaedic Oncology, Washington Cancer Institute, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC

RÉSUMÉ

Although a long-stemmed cemented hemiarthroplasty is frequently recommended for oncologic lesions of proximal femur, we have observed an alarming number of spontaneous stem fractures. The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify the associated risk factors for stem fractures in a study cohort of 60 (61 prostheses) during 1983−2007. At a mean follow-up of 41 months, 4/61 (6.6%) stems had fractured after a mean of 36 (12−92) months after surgery. All failed implants were Osteonics Omnifit (4/27; 14.8%) and multivariate analysis did not show any correlation with other studied variables. While the failures were successfully salvaged by conversion to a modular proximal femoral replacement, any implant failure in this population is devastating. Spontaneous onset of thigh pain in patients with long stems, particularly if associated with other risk factors, should raise suspicion of a fatigue fracture of the stem.


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