Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
Critical Reviews™ in Immunology
Facteur d'impact: 1.352 Facteur d'impact sur 5 ans: 3.347 SJR: 0.657 SNIP: 0.55 CiteScore™: 2.19

ISSN Imprimer: 1040-8401
ISSN En ligne: 2162-6472

Volumes:
Volume 39, 2019 Volume 38, 2018 Volume 37, 2017 Volume 36, 2016 Volume 35, 2015 Volume 34, 2014 Volume 33, 2013 Volume 32, 2012 Volume 31, 2011 Volume 30, 2010 Volume 29, 2009 Volume 28, 2008 Volume 27, 2007 Volume 26, 2006 Volume 25, 2005 Volume 24, 2004 Volume 23, 2003 Volume 22, 2002 Volume 21, 2001 Volume 20, 2000 Volume 19, 1999 Volume 18, 1998 Volume 17, 1997 Volume 16, 1996 Volume 15, 1995 Volume 14, 1994

Critical Reviews™ in Immunology

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevImmunol.v27.i3.50
pages 247-270

Peptide Mimotopes as Prototypic Templates of Broad-Spectrum Surrogates of Carbohydrate Antigens for Cancer Vaccination

Anastas Pashov
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA
Behjatolah Monzavi-Karbassi
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA
Gajendra Raghava
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA
Thomas Kieber-Emmons
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

RÉSUMÉ

Mechanisms of broad cross-protection, as seen in viral infection and also applied to vaccines, emphasize preexisting antibodies, CD8+ memory T cells, and accelerated B-cell responses reactive with conserved regions in antigens. Another practical application to induce broad-spectrum responses is making use of multispecific antigen recognition by antibodies and T cells. Antibody polyreactivity can be related to the capacity of the antigen-combining site to accommodate a number of different small epitopes or to attain different conformations. A better understanding of the functionality of molecular interactions with graded specificity might help the design of polyreactive immunogens inducing antibody responses to a predefined set of target antigens. We have found this approach useful in targeting tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens in cancer vaccine development. Using combinatorial libraries and pharmacophore design principles, carbohydrate mimetic peptides were created that not only induce antibodies with multiple specificities, but also cellular responses that inhibit tumor growth in vivo.