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Journal of Enhanced Heat Transfer
Facteur d'impact: 0.562 Facteur d'impact sur 5 ans: 0.605 SJR: 0.211 SNIP: 0.361 CiteScore™: 0.33

ISSN Imprimer: 1065-5131
ISSN En ligne: 1026-5511

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Journal of Enhanced Heat Transfer

DOI: 10.1615/JEnhHeatTransf.v1.i1.60
pages 65-75

Effect of Particle Size and Size Distribution on Particulate Fouling in Enhanced Tubes

L. M. Chamra
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA
Ralph L. Webb
Department of Mechanical Engineering The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Specialist in enhanced heat transfer and heat exchanger design

RÉSUMÉ

This paper describes the results of accelerated particulate fouling tests performed on different enhanced tubes and a plain tube. The key purpose of the tests was to investigate particulate fouling in practical heat exchanger systems where a mixture of particles exists in a flowing water stream. The applications considered are electric utility steam condensers on the Mississippi and Ohio rivers. These condensers operate with foulant materials consisting of silt and clay, having a distribution of particle sizes. Fouling data were taken for a wide range of particle concentrations, particle size, and velocity. The concentration was varied between 800 and 2,000 ppm for the particle sizes of 2,4 and 16 μm. In addition, the Reynolds number was varied between 24,000 and 65,000 for a constant concentration of 1,500 ppm.
The experimental results show that the enhanced tubes foul faster than the plain tube. However, at very low concentration the enhanced and plain tubes foul at the same rate. The asymptotic fouling resistance increases as the concentration increases and it decreases as the particle diameter and velocity increase.


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