Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
Atomization and Sprays
Facteur d'impact: 1.189 Facteur d'impact sur 5 ans: 1.596 SJR: 0.814 SNIP: 1.18 CiteScore™: 1.6

ISSN Imprimer: 1044-5110
ISSN En ligne: 1936-2684

Volumes:
Volume 29, 2019 Volume 28, 2018 Volume 27, 2017 Volume 26, 2016 Volume 25, 2015 Volume 24, 2014 Volume 23, 2013 Volume 22, 2012 Volume 21, 2011 Volume 20, 2010 Volume 19, 2009 Volume 18, 2008 Volume 17, 2007 Volume 16, 2006 Volume 15, 2005 Volume 14, 2004 Volume 13, 2003 Volume 12, 2002 Volume 11, 2001 Volume 10, 2000 Volume 9, 1999 Volume 8, 1998 Volume 7, 1997 Volume 6, 1996 Volume 5, 1995 Volume 4, 1994 Volume 3, 1993 Volume 2, 1992 Volume 1, 1991

Atomization and Sprays

DOI: 10.1615/AtomizSpr.2017016576
pages 645-664

NUMERICAL STUDY OF ELECTRIC REYNOLDS NUMBER ON ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC (EHD) ASSISTED ATOMIZATION

Patrick Sheehy
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173800, Bozeman, Montana 59717-3800, USA
Mark Owkes
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3800, USA

RÉSUMÉ

Electrohydrodynamic assisted atomization (EHD) injects electrical charges into liquid within the injector nozzle, creating an electrically charged atomizing liquid. For many relevant engineering flows, including liquid fuel injection, the charge mobility time scale (time it takes the charges to relax to the fluid-gas boundary) is similar in magnitude to the charge convection time scale (relevant flow time), which leads to a nontrivial electric charge distribution. This distribution within the liquid fuel may enhance atomization, the extent to which is dependent on the ratio of the previous time scales which are known as the electric Reynolds number (Ree). In this work, a computational approach for simulating two-phase EHD flows is used to investigate how Ree influences the resulting atomization quality. The computational approach is second order, conservative, and used to consistently transport the phase interface along with the discontinuous electric charge density and momentum. The scheme sharply handles the discontinuous electric charge density, allowing robust and accurate simulations of electric charge relaxation. Using this method, multiple three-dimensional simulations are performed with varying Ree values which highlight the effect of Ree on the atomization efficiency of a liquid jet. Comparison of these cases shows the importance of Ree on atomization and suggests that decreasing Ree (increasing charge mobility) leads to larger electric charge densities, increased Coulomb forces, and ultimately improved breakup during the atomization process.


Articles with similar content:

LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF SINGLE DROPLET AND LIQUID JET PRIMARY BREAKUP USING A COUPLED LEVEL SET/VOLUME OF FLUID METHOD
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.24, 2014, issue 4
James J. McGuirk, Feng Xiao, M. Dianat
GAS ENTRAINMENT CHARACTERISTICS OF DIESEL SPRAY DURING END OF INJECTION TRANSIENT
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.19, 2009, issue 11
Keiya Nishida, Yuhei Matsumoto, Jeekuen Lee, Seoksu Moon
COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF ATOMIZATION AND FUEL DROP SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN HIGH-SPEED PRIMARY BREAKUP
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.28, 2018, issue 4
Luis Bravo, D. Kim, S. Su, F. Ham
FLAT-SHEET TWIN-FLUID ATOMIZATION OF HIGH-VISCOSITY FLUIDS. PART I: NEWTONIAN LIQUIDS
Atomization and Sprays, Vol.2, 1992, issue 1
Paul E. Sojka, Keith E. Knoll
ELECTROSTATICALLY PRODUCED FUEL SPRAYS FOR COMBUSTION APPLICATIONS
ICLASS 94
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Vol.0, 1994, issue
John S. Shrimpton, D. Hu, Andrew J. Yule, W. Balachandran, A. Paul Watkins