Abonnement à la biblothèque: Guest
Portail numérique Bibliothèque numérique eBooks Revues Références et comptes rendus Collections
Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression
Facteur d'impact: 1.841 Facteur d'impact sur 5 ans: 1.927 SJR: 0.649 SNIP: 0.516 CiteScore™: 1.96

ISSN Imprimer: 1045-4403
ISSN En ligne: 2162-6502

Critical Reviews™ in Eukaryotic Gene Expression

DOI: 10.1615/CritRevEukarGeneExpr.v8.i3-4.50
pages 321-356

The Development of Monoclonal Antibodies for the Therapy of Cancer

Roula A. Farah
The Cancer Immunobiology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75235-8576
Birgitta Clinchy
The Cancer Immunobiology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75235-8576
Larry Herrera
The Cancer Immunobiology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75235-8576
Ellen S. Vitetta
The Cancer Immunobiology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75235-8576

RÉSUMÉ

Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were first decribed by Kohler and Milstein in 1975. Not only did this discovery lead to a Nobel prize, but it created an enormous scientific field that has now become a multimillion dollar industry. Mabs made the transition from laboratory reagents to clinical diagnostics very quickly. However, their development as therapeutic agents was, as predicted, more costly and time-consuming. Indeed, clinicians and scientists were required to learn a new set of rules for using these large, immunogenic, targeted agents in humans. Nevertheless, in 1997 the first Mab was licensed in the U.S. and several others will soon follow. In this review, we discuss Mab-based strategies for the treatment of cancer. We compare native, fragmented, recombinant and chimeric antibodies, bispecific antibodies, immunoconjugates, and immunoliposomes. The rationale for their development, their advantages, their in vitro and in vivo performance, and their clinical usefulness are discussed.


Articles with similar content:

Nonviral Vectors for In Vivo Gene Delivery: Physicochemical and Pharmacokinetic Considerations
Critical Reviews™ in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems, Vol.14, 1997, issue 2
Ram I. Mahato, Mitsuru Hashida, Yoshinobu Takakura
Glycosylated Cationic Liposomes for Cell-Selective Gene Delivery
Critical Reviews™ in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems, Vol.19, 2002, issue 2
Junzo Nakamura, Mitsuru Hashida, Koyo Nishida, Fumiyoshi Yamashita
Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Attenuation Factors and Their Selection for Cancer Diagnosis and Monitoring
Critical Reviews™ in Biomedical Engineering, Vol.43, 2015, issue 2-3
Diana Valdes Cabrera, Jesus Osvaldo Dominguez Garcia, Gordon Sarty
Nano-Aggregates: Emerging Delivery Tools for Tumor Therapy
Critical Reviews™ in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems, Vol.30, 2013, issue 6
Vinod Kumar Sharma, Ankit Jain, Vandana Soni
Small RNAs: The Qualified Candidates for Gene Manipulation in Diverse Clinical Pathologies
Critical Reviews™ in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems, Vol.31, 2014, issue 4
Gaurav Sharma, Kanwaljit Chopra, Indu Pal Kaur, Parveen Rishi, Sanjeev Puri