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Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal
SJR: 0.123

ISSN Imprimer: 2151-805X
ISSN En ligne: 2151-8068

Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal

DOI: 10.1615/EthicsBiologyEngMed.2017017298
pages 65-71

Child Labor and Inhumane Treatment of Children in Pakistan

Azhar Hussain
Xavier University School of Medicine–Aruba, Oranjenstad, Aruba
Farwa Ali
American University of Antigua, College of Medicine, Antigua

RÉSUMÉ

Child labor is a very concerning issue in southern Asian countries. This study focuses on the current situation of child labor in Pakistan. The factors that give rise to child labor include, but are not limited to, poor education systems, laws without regulation, poverty, and a cultural norm that has been maintained for generations. Children suffer from physical, mental, and social harm that can change their lives drastically and, in some cases, permanently. Although the government has passed laws prohibiting child labor, these laws are not regulated enough to establish a child labor–free country. For many reasons, people allow their children to work for a few rupees rather than keeping them at home where they do not generate income. Due to a lack of proper inspections and standardization, the educational institutions set up by the government are also not up to par, lacking resources, supplies, and even staff. In addition, the private educational system is expensive, creating further helplessness on the part of parents, many of whom send their children to work even before they have reached puberty. At this stage, although a child is very aware of his surroundings, he is vulnerable and can be easily manipulated. This is a dangerous time for them, because their characters can be influenced by the vicious cycle of labor creating a feeling of no way out, and they accept this as their fate. The children of Pakistan work in different industries, shops, on the street, and in homes for little to no income and in poor safety conditions. They are challenged physically and burdened mentally, giving rise to instability and a compromised future. Educating these children from the very beginning is a key to breaking this cycle; it can allow them to believe that other options and opportunities exist, that it is not necessary to accept the fate of a life without happiness.


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