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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms
Facteur d'impact: 1.423 Facteur d'impact sur 5 ans: 1.525 SJR: 0.431 SNIP: 0.716 CiteScore™: 2.6

ISSN Imprimer: 1521-9437
ISSN En ligne: 1940-4344

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International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms

DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v7.i3.520
408 pages

Antitumor Immunity in Agaricus sp., Paffia paniculata, and Propolis

Yeunhwa Gu
Department of Radiological Technology, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001-1 Kishiokacho, Suzuka City, Mie 510-02, Japan
Takenori Yamashita
Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001 Kishioka-cho Suzuka Mie 510-0293, Japan
Masami Oshima
Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001 Kishioka-cho Suzuka Mie 510-0293, Japan
Ikukatsu Suzuki
Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001 Kishioka-cho Suzuka Mie 510-0293, Japan
Toshihiro Maenaka
Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 1001 Kishioka-cho Suzuka Mie 510-0293, Japan
Norihide Mitsumoto
Shizen Kyusei Co., Ltd, Okayama, Japan

RÉSUMÉ

We investigated the antioxidant activity, lymphocyte versus polymorphonuclear leukocytes enhancement activity (L/P activity), and antitumor activity of three simple substances (Agaricus sp., Paffia paniculata, and Propolis) as well as a mixture of these three kinds of substances (ABP).
A powdered mixture (ABP) of these three substances were prepared using an agate mortar. For the extraction, 2000 mL of water was added to 300 g of finely powdered Agaricus sp. and then stirred for 2 hours in a water bath of 40 °C. After centrifugation for 10 minutes at 5000 rpm, the supernatant was filtered using folded filter paper. Distilled water (2000 mL) was added to the precipitates, and extraction was repeated in the same way. Dried Agaricus sp. was obtained by combining the supernatant from the first extraction with the supernatant from the second extraction (yield: 48.0 g, recovery: 16%). Propolis (100 g) was powdered, and 300 mL of 70% ethanolwas added. After drying at room temperature, filtration was carried out using folded filter paper. The filtrates were dried using an evaporator. Dried Propolis was obtained by freezing and thawing (yield: 53.5 g, recovery: 53.5%). Distilled water (2000 mL) was added to 200 g of finely powdered Paffia paniculata. Dried P. paniculata was obtained by the same technique (yield: 83.6 g, recovery: 41%).
With respect to radical scavenging activity, water and P. paniculata had no radical scavenging activity and showed no marked difference, whereas Agaricus sp. showed slight radical scavenging activity. Both ABP and Propolis showed greater radical scavenging activity than 0.2 mM Trolox, which was used as a positive standard.
Ten neonatal Swiss-Webster mice were divided into two groups. Saline was injected intraperitoneally into one group, and Agaricus sp. was injected intraperitoneally into the other group at a dose of 200 μg/mouse. L/P ratios after the administration of ABP (200 μg/ mouse) were 0.91 ± 0.07 (day 6), 3.23 ± 0.39 (day 10), and 4.82 ± 0.46 (day 14), whereas L/P ratios in the control group were 0.43 ± 0.04 (day 6), 0.96 ± 0.08 (day 10), and 1.43 ± 0.39 (day 14). The L/P ratio after the administration of Propolis was significantly elevated (p < 0.01), as compared to the control group.
When the ABP mixture was administered at a dose of 400 μg/kg for 34 consecutive days, remarkably high antitumor activity (suppressive ratio: 85.1%, p < 0.01) was shown.
In Sarcoma 100 solid carcinoma, when Agaricus sp. (200 mg/kg B.W./day), Paffia paniculata (60 mg/ kg B.W./day), and Propolis (80 mg/kg B.W./day) were orally administered for 34 consecutive days, suppressive ratios were 60.3% (p < 0.05), 54.8% (p < 0.05), and 62.6% (p < 0.05), respectively. When the ABP mixture was administered at a dose of 400 mg/kg B.W./day for 34 consecutive days, remarkably high antitumor activity (suppressive ratio: 83.5%, p < 0.01) was shown.


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